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Controlling the Distance and Posture in Silat

Posted in Silat with tags , , , , , , , on January 3, 2017 by Combative Corner

Control the distance, control the fight.

maul-mornie-2Bruneian Martial Art – Silat Suffian Bela Diri is a self defence system known for their positioning and distance control to capitalise on the opponent’s structure and balance. This is one of many options.

We train/learn to move our position i.e. training basic footwork (langkah) through the use of the blade, because we assume our attacker is always armed with either an impact or edged weapon. Training with that in mind we assume that every strike that comes from the attacker that lands to our body could be fatal or could cause serious injuries.

In training we try our best NOT to get hit, the goal as a self defence system is to come out of any physical confrontation with little or no injuries but in a real situation we do expect to get hit and we have training for that as well.

This clip was from the 2 days Silat Suffian Bela Diri Seminar in Hoofddorp, Netherlands, 21st & 22nd November 2015. The seminar was organised by SSBD Dutch Group Leader Marcel Horstman, and hosted by Master Cherry Smith at www.satriamudahoofddorp.nl Thank you Ivo van Adrighem for your patience in assisting me in my demonstrations and instructions.

Maul Mornie

*post is from FB post (w/permission) from 12/12/16.

The Footwork of Silat

Posted in Silat, Videos with tags , , , , , , , , on December 13, 2016 by Combative Corner

Why do SSBD move the way we move?

maul-mornie-1This is why we have footsweeps and ankle breaks in Bruneian Martial Arts. Why we are mobile but rooted and we dont emphasis to much on low stance in application, only in training. We don’t stomp and we don’t jump.

Traditionally Bruneians live on water villages along the Bruneian river for more then 700 years. Marco Polo once stopped over in Brunei ports and said Brunei was like “The Venice of the East”.  There were more than 31 villages that existed once on the water village.  Royalty, Nobility, traders, commoners lived on the water villages.  Farmers live on land, of course. 

The bridges and pathways are the place to test your skills.

The footsweeps are to trip your opponents off the bridge, the ankle breaks are to make sure they can’t swim when the fall off the bridge.

Foot traps are just take downs when done on solid ground, that is all it is, a take down.  He stands back up and he can keep on fighting you.  Foot traps when done on a bridge over water, you break their ankle, they fall in the water and they struggle to swim and they (can) drown.

Not many knows what real footsweeps and ankle traps are for.  In Brunei we do it because it is a part of our environment.  The environment created the fighting system, it’s not there because it’s cool.  No other can claim this.  That is why we move the way we move.

SSBD is a traditional art.  We move like the old ways because it is effective and efficient.

Maul Mornie.

*entry from 12/10/2016, Facebook profile

*SSBD stands for Silat Suffian Bela Diri

The Ground Attack Posture from OutFoxxed

Posted in Self-Defense, Techniques, Training, Uncategorized, Women's Self-Defense with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 15, 2016 by chencenter

Since many of the attacks on women are of a sexual nature, we have to know how to fight back from different positions, including from our back!

The “G.A.P.”…

or Ground Attack Posture, is our favorite way of delivering a powerful attack and helping to create space for escape.  Take a look at this short and informative video that we made for you guys and gals!  If you have any questions, please comment on the video or visit our website (blog) for more details.  We have write-ups on each movement/technique we teach in order to improve your understanding.

And if you haven’t already, please subscribe, like and share.

[OutFoxxed Program on YouTube]

Brought to you by: Michael & Jennifer Joyce

Head instructors at the Outfoxxed Program

COMBATIVE CORNER IS ON FACEBOOK, INSTAGRAM & TWITTER

 

The Valkyrie – Attacking with Sword & Shield

Posted in Safety, Self-Defense, Training, Videos, Women's Self-Defense with tags , , , , , , , , on December 9, 2015 by chencenter

To all our readers here at CombativeCorner.  We have two more videos to share with you to introduce you me (Michael Joyce) and my wife’s (Jennifer) new project, to share our Outfoxxed Self-Defense Program globally.  We’ve previously shared our introductory video, managing distance, 3 predatory types, and the Fence.  Now, it’s time to share one of our favorite movements of all-time, the Valkyrie.

Enjoy!

Outfoxxed Program Website

Outfoxxed Program YouTube

The 8 Energies and 5 Movements of Taijiquan

Posted in Internal Arts, Martial Arts, Taijiquan, Teaching Topic, Training, Videos with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 3, 2015 by chencenter

Chen Xiang demonstrating the Hunyuan 13 Shi set at the 2015 Hunyuan meeting in Beijing, China. The 13 in the name refers not to the number of movements but the 13 techniques: 8 energies (ba fa) 掤 peng, 捋 lu, 挤 ji, 按 an, 採 cai, 挒 lie, 肘 zhou, 靠 kao, as well as 5 stepping methods (bu fa) 前进 qian jin (advance forward), 后退 hou tui (retreat/ draw back), 左顾 zuo gu (glance/step left), 右盼 you pan (glance/step right), 中定 zhong ding (central fixed).  Video by: Douglas Martin

The martial art of Taijiquan is based on 13 principles (8 forces+5 movements).  All movements of Taijiquan are built upon these principles & are used in various combinations within each posture, transition and application.  Please watch the above video of Master Chen Xiang and watch this superb demonstration of these principles in his form which he calls the Hunyuan 13 Shi.  Those familiar with the internal arts may notice the other (somewhat hidden) stylings of Qigong, Bajiquan (Eight Ultimate Style Boxing), and Shuai Jou (Chinese Wrestling).  For the people interested in the culmination of these principles and power it garners should check out this older video of Chen Xiang testing fajin (explosive power) at Stanford University.  [link]

FORCES

  • PENG– refers to the outward (or upward) expansion of energy.
  • LU– often referred to as “roll back,” Lu is the ability to absorb, yield/deflect incoming force.  There are 3 characteristics of Lu are: Yielding (Jan), Merging (Ian) & Adhering (Nien)
  • JI– is often thought of as a “forward press,” however it also best described as a “squeezing out of space.”
  • AN– is a downward movement of energy, best translated into “(relaxed) sinking.”
  • CAI– (Tsai) translated into “downward pluck,” Cai is a combination of Lu and An.
  • LIE– (Lieh) Lie or “Split” is a combination of Peng and Ji.
  • ZHOU– Elbowing. In Chen style, elbows are overtly shown in all angles, with a coiling effect.
  • KAO– when the arms are bound/distance is too close to punch, we can use a “Shouldering.”

MOVEMENTS

  • JIN– Advance forward
  • TUI– Retreat back
  • GU– Gaze/Step left
  • PAN– Gaze/Step right
  • DING– Center-Fixed

 

 

The Fence – Fending off an Attack Before it Begins

Posted in Safety, Self-Defense, Techniques, Training, Violence, Women's Self-Defense with tags , , , , , , , , on November 10, 2015 by chencenter

[Read Entire Article]

If you’ve watched The 3 Main Postures video, you have some knowledge of what the Fence is and why we use it – but let’s go a little deeper, shall we?

The Fence, or versions of it, is as old as physical conflict itself.  But it wasn’t until the amazing teacher, author and martial artist Geoff Thompson (Coventry, UK) and his club really started to bring it into popularity as an effective way of managing the dynamics of physical altercations.  As a doorman (aka. bouncer), Geoff was able to learn quickly just how effective and important this technique can be.

WHAT IS THE FENCE?

The Fence is a temporary barrier we use to keep a potential attacker under control. All the Fence postures that we recommend start off with the body in a non-threatening position, with the purpose being – to lessen the aggression/intent of the person trying to harm you and to by you time to scan for help, plan an escape route, find an improvised weapon, and/or prepare to pre-emptively strike.   [READ MORE]

MICHAEL JOYCE

OUTFOXXED.COM

The 3 Predator Types Everyone Should Know

Posted in Self-Defense, Training, Videos, Violence, Women's Self-Defense with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 2, 2015 by chencenter

Video #1 was on distance management, because, let’s face it – He/She who controls the distance, controls the encounter.

Here’s video #2, and another subject that doesn’t get talked about as much as it should, and that is “Who are we dealing with in the encounter?”

Knowing our opponent can be instrumental in helping us quickly choose our action-plan (especially when it comes to Women’s Self-Defense).  Men don’t have NEARLY as many Insidious attackers as women, and thus train primarily for the Social and Asocial ones.

IF YOU TEACH WOMEN

Please stress the importance of understanding the methods Insidious attackers use in order to control or hurt them.  Most women encounter some form of “insidiousness” on a weekly basis.

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