Archive for Silat

Controlling the Distance and Posture in Silat

Posted in Silat with tags , , , , , , , on January 3, 2017 by Combative Corner

Control the distance, control the fight.

maul-mornie-2Bruneian Martial Art – Silat Suffian Bela Diri is a self defence system known for their positioning and distance control to capitalise on the opponent’s structure and balance. This is one of many options.

We train/learn to move our position i.e. training basic footwork (langkah) through the use of the blade, because we assume our attacker is always armed with either an impact or edged weapon. Training with that in mind we assume that every strike that comes from the attacker that lands to our body could be fatal or could cause serious injuries.

In training we try our best NOT to get hit, the goal as a self defence system is to come out of any physical confrontation with little or no injuries but in a real situation we do expect to get hit and we have training for that as well.

This clip was from the 2 days Silat Suffian Bela Diri Seminar in Hoofddorp, Netherlands, 21st & 22nd November 2015. The seminar was organised by SSBD Dutch Group Leader Marcel Horstman, and hosted by Master Cherry Smith at www.satriamudahoofddorp.nl Thank you Ivo van Adrighem for your patience in assisting me in my demonstrations and instructions.

Maul Mornie

*post is from FB post (w/permission) from 12/12/16.

The Footwork of Silat

Posted in Silat, Videos with tags , , , , , , , , on December 13, 2016 by Combative Corner

Why do SSBD move the way we move?

maul-mornie-1This is why we have footsweeps and ankle breaks in Bruneian Martial Arts. Why we are mobile but rooted and we dont emphasis to much on low stance in application, only in training. We don’t stomp and we don’t jump.

Traditionally Bruneians live on water villages along the Bruneian river for more then 700 years. Marco Polo once stopped over in Brunei ports and said Brunei was like “The Venice of the East”.  There were more than 31 villages that existed once on the water village.  Royalty, Nobility, traders, commoners lived on the water villages.  Farmers live on land, of course. 

The bridges and pathways are the place to test your skills.

The footsweeps are to trip your opponents off the bridge, the ankle breaks are to make sure they can’t swim when the fall off the bridge.

Foot traps are just take downs when done on solid ground, that is all it is, a take down.  He stands back up and he can keep on fighting you.  Foot traps when done on a bridge over water, you break their ankle, they fall in the water and they struggle to swim and they (can) drown.

Not many knows what real footsweeps and ankle traps are for.  In Brunei we do it because it is a part of our environment.  The environment created the fighting system, it’s not there because it’s cool.  No other can claim this.  That is why we move the way we move.

SSBD is a traditional art.  We move like the old ways because it is effective and efficient.

Maul Mornie.

*entry from 12/10/2016, Facebook profile

*SSBD stands for Silat Suffian Bela Diri

Superb Demonstration of Silat & Arnis

Posted in Arnis, Silat, Training, Weapons with tags , , , , , , on June 6, 2014 by Combative Corner

Evan Tai owns a kick boxing gym in Hong Kong and occasionally trains with Silat expert Maul Mornie (when he’s in HK).  Obviously, after viewing these clips you’ll be able to see the caliber of martial artist this young man is [Tai].  Enjoy!

CombativeCorner.Com

*Evan Tai’s YouTube Channel : Eskrimamate

10 Questions with Maul Mornie

Posted in 10 Questions, Silat with tags , , , , , , , , on December 3, 2010 by Combative Corner

The Combative Corner had the chance to catch up with Silat master Maul Mornie.  Maul is from Seria, a small town in Brunei Darussalam but is currently based in the United Kingdom.  Maul has a popular YouTube channel that he started in Feb. 2006 and currently has 4,000+ subscribers and almost 3.5 million upload views (as of Dec. 2010).  Click his picture above to view is website or click here, Maul565 to visit his YouTube channel.

¤

Q.1

How young were you when you started training in the martial arts? (and did you study one system only?)
I started training in the silat at the late age of 12 years old under the guidance of my grandfather and great grandfather. They started when they were 6 years old. One other art that I commit to practicing is traditional japanese jujitsu. I started informally (without a curriculum) when I was in college at age 20 from a Malaysian who was working in Brunei.

I am a bit choosy when it comes to martial arts training; it has to have the right attitude, the right methods and the right mindset. I have met many martial artist in my travels around the world and I found ALL martial arts and systems are effective.  What makes them less efficient is the practitioner itself. When coming to Europe to continue my studies, I found out not all traditional jujitsu styles are the same, regardless if visually they look identical.

While people are in the MMA and Tactical Combatives hype, I was not looking for a “reality-based martial arts” or “combative fighting”; just good training with good spirited people, I was more interested with the “traditional” martial arts that makes people engage with one another with respect and self developement. And like the silat that I was taught, traditional jujitsu had the same principles of “mutual benefit”.

Q.2

Did you always have a desire to teach Silat professionally or did you have other passions?
I started to instruct publicly in an open seminar in May 2007. I never thought anyone would be interested to learn traditional silat.  Back home in Brunei, the younger generations are more interested with taekwondo, karate, kung fu, Muay Thai – everything non local and anything that they see on TV and the movies.

I was an engineering student in the UK, it all started when I was showing 2 guys one “option” on how defend from a knife in one of the jujitsu classes (they worked as security guys). Through word of mouth they promoted me to their friends. They were more interested with fast, effective, self defence techniques rather than traditional training, while other students had part time jobs at cinemas, restaurants, etc on the weekends. I was training security guys the size of rugby players with bisceps the size of my head.
A musician from South Africa (who lived just a few houses from me) approached me on my final year before I completed my studies because he was attacked while he was abroad. He trained twice a week. I was about to leave for Brunei in few months, so as reference for him when I leave, we recorded a video in the park nearby. Being a student at that time, I had no DVD burner to give him a copy, so I decided to post it on a “descreet” website ‘http://www.facebook.com/l/b505f7Lk5-2DYFTKocWfAi2alww;www.Youtube.com’. This was in 2007, that time when you search for ‘Silat’ on youtube, there were less than 5 videos. So who’s going to know?

In a few weeks I’ve received emails and messages from a number of people from around the world. I was thinking to delete the videos because it was starting to gain too much attention and the fact that I was being bombarded by emails from people I do not know. Though I felt honoured and I appreciate everyone’s support and emails, most were more interested to discuss techniques, philosophy, and not physical training.

It was not until 2 months before I was about to leave for home, an Italian businessman/martial artist by the name of Carlo Andreis, after watching my videos, contacted me and invited me for a 10 days private lesson and 1 public seminar. 16 martial arts instructors from Milan, Verona and Desenzano came to my 1st seminar. They liked it and Carlo Andries asked me if I was interested to come to Italy again in 2 months, just a few weeks before I was about to leave for Brunei for good, so I said to myself, why not? The seminar attracted people from outside of Italy, and after that I got invited to Germany by Cristian Velici and then everything was like a snowball rolled down a hill.

I was not intending to teach martial arts, if I had not posted that one youtube video, my life’s journey would have been different and I would be an engineer in Brunei right now.

Q.3

How do you compare your training from when you lived in Brunei to when you moved to the UK?
In Brunei, as a child training, it was more intense.  In the west you would call it “Child Abuse”, but for me it was everyday training, I also got all the love and attention I needed as a child from my parent and my whole family. As a child you tend to soak everything up and question nothing; I go to school, go for extra classes, come home, train and sleep, this was my routine in my early years. When I first started in Europe instructing adults who themselves are experienced and skilled in their own martial art systems, I came to meet a different mindset , they tend to ask questions “Why? Why? Why do this? Why do that? Why don’t you do it this way”, the culture back home is different, you don’t ask why, you don’t compare the art or the movement, you just do what you were told and you gain all the benefits from that training.

But again I also understand that as a child, I had no responsibilities other than school and my daily chores, but as an adult, you cannot go to work or come home to your family with bruises on your face and your forearm (plus juggling everyday life responsibilities).

Q.4

Are there any changes that you’ve personally made to your martial art teaching to make it more “exciting” or “mainstream” to non-Bruniens?
I have not changed anything in instructing the dedicated members of the closed doors training groups. Travelling to different countries and meeting people from different backgrounds, I only changed the intensity of the training and body conditioning when intructing the ‘open public’ seminars to avoid “liability issues” when training with people I dont personally know.

Basically, my closed door training are more to “body and movement conditioning” and my public seminars are “techniques-based”.

Q.5

What are your feelings about sport competition?  (Do you encourage your students to test their skills in this manner?)
There is no competitive mindset in SSBD, its aim is to finish a confrontation as soon as possible efficiently without effort. A sports (competitive) mindset and traditional training mindset in martial arts training are two totally different things.  – At the end of the day it depends on your goals and intention. 8 out of 10 of who trains in SSBD is not interested in competing in the tournament circuit, most I have met are interested in self-preservation and self-defence regardless of gender, age and life style. Everyone who trains with me either are already skilled in another art or they start from scratch and have different goals and intentions in their training. What they decide to do in the martial arts training not involving SSBD or myself, I usually give them full support.

Q.6

Silat Suffian Bela Diri is a very efficient and deadly art-form, especially when you bring weapons to the table.  How important is gun and knife training to you system?
SSBD does not teach anyone “how to use a weapon”, it teaches one to “understand the use” of the weapon, so that we can defend from it. For example, to understand to defend from a good boxer you learn from boxers, to understand to defend from a powerful kick you learn from Muay Thai practitioners. To learn to effectively defend from weapons, it is very important to efficiently understand their use.

Q7.

In getting to know you (through your videos, website and facebook) I see that family is very important to you.  Is there a strong family tradition of teaching Silat in your heritage?
Family is very important to me. Silat has been in my family (both my father’s and mother’s side) for generation but it was never taught openly to the public, only for family protection and personal preservation.

Q8.

You are busy with SSBD workshops and travel all over the world.  What is your favorite and least favorite things about traveling?
Most airports that I travel out from are basically 4hr+ away from where I live, I have to check in 2 hours before which means I have to leave home at least 6hrs before the flight. What’s funny is that my flights in Europe are never longer than between 1hr to 2hrs 30mins but the journey from home to the airports take a large part of the day. I travel via public transport, what is usually frustrating is when the flight times fly too early or returning too late during the day that there are no public transport services available before or after the specified times, that I have to sleep over – either at airports or airport hotels, which basically are unnecessary expenses and time away from home .

There was one time I had to leave home about 12 hours before the flight due to worker’s strike.  The flight was only 2hrs.

Q9.

There are many people, even experienced martial artists that do not know a lot about Silat.  What makes SSBD different/unique?
Unfortunately I do not have enough experience in other systems to compare SSBD with other arts. I can only present my videos for others to see and only “they” can see what is unique and what is less in it.

Since I posted my 1st youtube video, it is open for ALL to comment, I do not filter them, I only delete those who promote religious or racial slandering. I take everything as positive and constructive criticism, these people help keep my feet on the ground, though once in a while there are people who just give negative comment for the sake of commenting and brings no benefit whatsoever to anything.

I think that is what makes SSBD unique, I am open for any constructive criticism, it helps keep quality control. I am proud to say that for the past 4 years I’ve only posted around 30 to 33 quality videos on youtube.

Q10.

What are your future plans regarding your work?
At the moment, I plan everything 1 year ahead in advance, I try to take little steps to reach my goals and concentrate all my efforts to those little steps. For me reaching success is an ongoing process, a position which I am yet to reach, I have my own personal mile stone, that is to make my family proud of me and not disappoint them.

I constantly receive invitations for seminar in different parts of the world, but I try to make the right decisions, I don’t just accept the next invitation that comes my way, I have to evaluate the long term potential before accepting anything, which includes networking and positive growth in the propogation of SSBD and Bruneian martial heritage in general.

¤

For More Information on Maul Mornie and SSBD, visit his website by clicking his above picture

¤

Follow The Combative Corner on Twitter for the latest posts… and daily, amazing quotes.

10 Questions With Luke Holloway

Posted in 10 Questions, Self-Defense with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 25, 2010 by Combative Corner

The Combative Corner is proud to introduce you to a guy that is (and has been) making a big name for himself in the field of close quarter combatives, security, crisis response and risk management (Law Enforcement / Military / Special Forces).

The Combative Corner became aware of Mr. Holloway through his many channels on YouTube (TeamWuJin, RCI Japan, Raw LEO Combatives, and more!).  Luke Holloway is the founder of Raw Combat International and is now in 24 countries.  Find out more about this extraordinary teacher at his websites Luke-Holloway.Com and Raw-Combat.Com.

Now… for our exclusive interview!  Enjoy.

¤

What brought you to teaching tactical self-prtotection?

I was simply sharing tactics based on my experience in my job (event/club security, protection, investigations and risk management consulting). I guess I just attracted a bunch of like minded people who saw it necessary to develop and maintain such skills. I never meant to create a ‘system’ or anything like that but people just started watching me on youtube (which was up for local students benefit in the beginning) and then I started to get asked to share things in many places (19 countries in the past couple of years).  As certified by the Australian Government in Risk Management, Security, Protection, Crisis Management, Sports Coaching and Work Place Training & Assessment (etc) I was able to structure things pretty easily.. things kinda just.. fell into place.

You’re currently in Shinjuku, Japan.  Where did you grow up and what brought you to Japan?

I’m in Japan because of a circumstance which I won’t go into for protection of my own privacy & personal security if that’s ok.  But I’d worked here before and spoke the language before I re-located here after doing a bit in Malaysia, Thailand, Hong Kong, China and Taiwan.  I am originally from Queensland, Australia and grew up hunting/shooting and doing not much-else then that and martial arts.. hahaha, a sheltered childhood maybe??  lol.. just wasn’t into football or anything like that really…

What’s the biggest obstacle for you as a self-defense instructor?

Training civilians with ‘too’ much experience.  I think every instructor knows what I mean.  Although I just see myself as sharing what I got, people need to understand that martial arts and tactical training are two COMPLETELY different things! I don’t care if you put the words ‘Tactical’ or ‘Commando’ or ‘Combat’ or ‘Extreme’ or whatevers goin’ on these days, you can take one look and know it’s shit! Most of our members or active operatives in Security, Law Enforcement/Customs or Military including Japans newest Special Forces Group (CRF). I know what backgrounds, what training they have and what training they need to be able to respond to incidents effectively in a professional manner and therefore it’s easier to ‘train’ them.. but civys with a chip on their shoulder about doing a krav maga seminar and 2 kickboxing lessons I don’t have much time for to be honest. Too many shit dribblers! Talking about how they do ‘military martial arts’ or some shit how they are a ‘bodyguard’ yet don’t know the first thing about personal security concepts as they just mentioned their wife’s name, their kids names, where they live and where they’re from.. (displaying the fact that they don’t have a clue about any of the BASICS of protection on a professional level) I got all I need now to find them if I need to, lol.. just a waste of my time!

The fact is professionals, as in cops/military don’t need to know the style’s master, a bunch of foreign terms and how to wear pajamas and act as ‘in character (asian dress up party) as possible to learn how to survive the streets! They don’t need Jurus/Katas they need drills to become skills that they can employ immediately! Don’t get me wrong, I love martial arts, but I accept it for what it is and even though I live in Japan, I got no interest in trying to become the last Samurai! lol, but on the other hand I’m not one of these guys that loves to sit there and talk about how shitty martial arts techniques are but have no real answers myself..Trying to ‘prove techniques wrong’ is a waste of time I think, especially if you haven’t learned the foundational elements nor had to adapt and employ it in the field… other than that, yeah I got no time to talk about shit cos I’m too busy training! Feel me?

What would your reason for the “Streetfighter”/RBSD practitioner to learn a softer art such as Tai Ji Quan?

I don’t see myself as a ‘street fighter’ or this or that, my name’s Luke, I’m from the land down under and I don’t cop shit from anyone! That’s how it is, in my world; Respect is the only currency! I give everyone a dollar in the beginning, they sit there and expect the world and don’t show any real appreciation, gratitude or consideration but when it comes time for them to ask me for that dollar back I say ‘Sorry mate, but you only got 10 cents left in your account’.. and leave it at that!

I’ve dealt with armed attacks on myself and clients/patrons in public and also in private and I am training tactics that rely on assertiveness with committed, controlled aggressiveness and intimidation! That’s how I am, I made up my mind in the beginning that I refuse to be the victim!

As for Taiji, if you train push hands you learn to move/deal with any line of force/tension and or ‘energy’ (without being cosmic about it, let’s just say ‘gravity’).. So the expression of the ‘technique’ is irrelevant if you are truly ‘listening’.. not waiting but LISTENING (what you technicians like to refer to as ‘ting-jing’) which is making use of your hightened sense of awareness to expand that awareness through your own structure and into your opponents.. Now, I know I’m probably loosing more than half the people reading this by now so I can go back to being gutter mouthed sharp shootin’ Aussie! It’s simple: Control yourself and you can control your opponent (if you TRAIN how to).. knowing how is one thing but maintaining your skills and awareness levels is another thing! In short Taiji has helped me BIG TIME in shooting, grappling and restraining, contain & removal in the field; Simply because you train to deal with anything in an instinctive, natural/fluent and appropriate manner! The biggest misconception about taiji is that it’s some sort of spiritual cosmic bull shit and that you need to try and be more asian then the next fella to be able to do it/teach it. I stopped wearing the pajamas (guilty but I admit I once did, come on.. we were all brain washed at one point lol) once I started push hands and found that it saved my arse more than a few times in the field wearing gear and all!

What is one of the hardest things to teach (in your opinion)?

Kids classes!

hahaha, I’m a parent my self so I’m very passionate about kids becoming self reliant and making the right choices in life and of courses making their personal security a priority a long with training self protection (self defense is just not being pro-active enough as they train to wait for the attacks). I started teaching in the year 2000 and I’ve found that doing kids classes is very rewarding and enjoyable but hard to maintain your personal life/space as parents try and get involved or try and get you involved in their shit fights etc.. it’s quite hard to maintain a balance sometimes..

The other hardest thing to share with people is Taiji, it really just takes patience and commitment like no other art, but the mental, emotional and of course physical benefits are like no other.

What are some of the things you’d want every woman to know about personal self-protection?

As I work a lot as a security consultant advising corporations and most recently even regiments on risk management/crisis responses and prevention planning it is quite easy to give advice to women because most of them don’t know to start.. You can see it when they walk.. put yourself in a stalkers shoes, does she walk with intent? Does she look like she’s off with the fairies (day dreaming)?  Any other indications of being an easy target such as: Ipod, mobile phone being used, dark street she has chosen to take, etc?

The main thing is not setting a pattern and preventing stalkers (who have the potential to become kidnappers/rapists and other scum that just haven’t stepped over the line yet but are heading towards it with intent). Making privacy protection a priority ie – not adding people you don’t know on facebook (etc) when you put up your whole life on there including where you are at what time (like anyone gives a shit).. actually it’s funny cos a lot of these dudes who are ‘Tacti-coool’ trainers don’t obey basic principals of privacy protection/personal security either.. again, jokes in my book! But yeah, it’s not about learning mad martial arts skills it’s about using your head! Martial arts requires maintenance where as personal protection requires simple common sense, sometimes you just gotta show them how to develop that.. Can I leave that one there for now?  I think it’ll go on way too long! hahaha, sorry..

We’ve noticed from your videos that you enjoy knifeplay.  What is the draw?  And do you feel that knife drills are important for every “serious” self-protection student?

It’s like this, people in the UK ask my why I bother with it and people in the US ask my why don’t I show more of the ‘tactical stuff’ on youtube (free)?   Well, it’s the situation and the impacting factors (as always!) but think about this, even if you aren’t carrying a knife and you do disarm it/one and you don’t have a clue about survival tactics (with the knife, I’m not talking about martial arts – screw that for the time being)/ Weapon Retention it’s probably more dangerous to you than it is the assailant. Plus, our knife work is adapted to house hold utensils, pens, screwdrivers you name it, we’ll use it when necessary! Don’t get me wrong, again, I love martial arts but I’m a big white guy in the line of work who needs urban survival skills for myself AND others! I’m not a little asian guy and I don’t try to be! I don’t play dress ups anymore, I live in the real world and have had to deal with real shit.  Anyone else seeing what I see has woken up to them selves!

What has your experience (thusfar) as a full time trainer taught you?

Shit, I don’t know where to begin, off the top of my head (like the rest of these answers) I guess just being able to deal with different people..

I have taught security, law enforcement, customs and military/SF in more countries then I ever imagined visiting and when you look at different people in different jobs from different countries you get a pretty good variety. A lot of positive things have come of it; Patience, Tolerance, Flexibility and I guess another big thing is not giving a shit anymore.. by that I mean I used to care what people think about me/my material and now I’ve got bigger things in my life to be concerned with. Kids talking shit on the internet doesn’t mean much to me, they’re the one’s loosing sleep over it all! hahaha

What are your thoughts regarding Traditional Martial Art form work?  In your opinion, do they help or hinder a practitioner’s ability to react spontaneously with the proper intent?  If so, do you feel there should be a short, CQC (close quarter combat) form or kata?

No.

I do not believe that Kata/Jurus helps you with that at all! Not only is there no-one in-front of you, there’s no situation/incident which is spontaneous/random/intimidating/un-fair etc.. However, it’s like pad work.. it just develops a certain skill. In Chinese arts we do forms (Taolu) and in my southern training a lot of it was based on developing intrinsic energies within the body which create explosive power, in Japanese arts it’s kata and all about basics being reliable (however in my jujutsu training here in Japan there was never kata) in SE Asian (Malaysian/Indonesian/Filipino) we have Jurus and to me they are much more realistic (as they are more savage when the Buah ‘application’ is trained) but still are limiting.  And this is why we do a lot of scenario based simulation training with no rules/limitations (mind you I’ve lost the same tooth twice doing it recently haha) but it’s worth it, well worth it! I sometimes still train my tonglong forms/drills cos they rip the shit out of you and develop and insane amount of energy but I don’t bother with Jurus much anymore, I’m not a muslim nor an asian so I don’t pretend to understand the ‘cultural benefits’, when I’m in SE Asia training Silat I simply follow and of course appreciate whatever is shared with me, weather it be ‘the deep dark secrets of jungle blade arts or a nice meal and tea, but my own personal training has a different objective. Today, I’m still training taiji, regardless of what anyone says – it’s the real deal.. unfortunately it will take most people until they are in there 50s (no longer to do what they can now and have to look at an alternative) to realize/appreciate that.

Where does Luke Holloway see himself 10 years from now?

Everyday brings new things/beings and situations into your life that will effect you, I try and make the best out of every situation.

So I’m just crusin’ along seein’ what’s goin’ on… make sense? As long as I have the health and safety of me and my family, I’m not too bothered about what I’m doing. Of course I’m passionate about it, but I’d be just as happy to be doing other things that are positive and productive for me – it’s not about leaving a ‘legacy’ or ‘being remembered as this or that.’ I couldn’t care less! I’ve have met wonderful people and had a wonderful time appreciating everyday and making the most of it, if it ended tomorrow I’m still content, if I’m still doing it in 10 years and we are still happy and healthy we are blessed.

Bonus Questions: We just recently had a Roundtable Discussion.  The question was “What’s your favorite (martial art/inspirational) book that you OWN, and why?”

I collected martial arts books in high-school/college and realized they were all B.S. when I started in my profession, that was even further supported when I saw a lot of those clowns on youtube. In a book, you can say what you want and show what you want in slow motion and make yourself out to be anyone, from anywhere doing anything… same in MA mags which are total B.S. these days, they have ‘Halls of fame’ Bwhahahaha, what a joke! The ‘famous’ guys are the ones who have spent over 10 grand on advertising with them. I advertised in a magazine once and before then no matter how much I tried they wouldn’t put my material in their news or do a story or anything.  If it’s not profitable, they are not interested, which is fair enough. But I went home earlier this year and I don’t have any idea why but I brought a magazine (MA) and it’s still got the same fat guys in pajamas talking the same shit about how ‘samurai’ they are or how their lineage is more ‘correct’ or how ‘scientific’ their techniques are.  It’s all a big joke to me and so are books in most cases! I would rather read someone’s story and get into the guy’s head if I wanted to learn from him.  A recent book I have is called ‘The Art of Deception.’ It is full of case stories about one of the worlds best hackers and manipulators of the human element of security through social engineering.  It re-enforced that I am on the right path as a consultant & active operative but also gave me the chance to see it from another point of view, the criminals.

I’m sorry mate, that’s probably not really what you wanted to hear and I know a lot of people may be offended by some of the things I’ve said.  In my experience it usually means I’ve hit the nail on the head and that nail was on their weak spot!  But nothing is mean to be in vain or offensive, you asked my opinion on things and I gave it, I hate preachers and shit dribblers so I refuse to be/act like one.

Anyhow, I’d like to say thank you and the Combative Corner for giving me the chance to be heard.

Bless you all.

¤


Roundtable Discussion 004: Next Best Style

Posted in Roundtable Discussion, Styles with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 31, 2010 by Combative Corner

Six martial art instructors were asked,

“If you were given only one style/system of martial art to study (besides your primary discipline), what would it be and why?”

Sensei Robert Lara – For me it would be Wing Chun Kung Fu.  I already train Wing Chun and that is why I picked it. Because it works! No messing around. A very solid and sound fighting art.  It is very much like the Japanese Aiki arts. To control your attackers mind and take away there intent to do harm to you or others.  To stick to an attack once launched is a very sound way to apply control. Be it deflecting blocks, Punches, Elbows, Chops, Low kicks. Sweeps, Throws.  I Love Wing Chun!  I have great love for all the arts but there are those systems that you know are for you.

¤

Sensei Brad Vaughn – If I could study one martial arts style it would be Kung Fu. It really doesn’t matter what style(though I think Southern Shaolin would fit me nicely) because I find any and all forms of Kung Fu both beautiful and dangerously effective at the same time. I’ve had the opportunity to study a couple of different styles, first in college and now recently and I never cease to be amazed by it. It is my “holy grail” of martial arts. I train hard in the martial arts hoping that one day I will be worthy to become a black belt in Kung Fu as well. I would love to just take off to China for a couple of years and just immerse myself in the culture and study Kung Fu up close and personal and then return to the states a true Kung Fu Masters but I don’t think my wife would go along with that.

¤

Sifu Freddie Lee – Jeet Kune Do. Because there are no limitations. It is not a style or a system, it gives you the realization to go beyond.

¤

Coach Johnny Kuo There are so many choices of martial arts that it’s difficult to answer this question. Almost any art would be a viable choice given access to a talented instructor. If I had to choose an art besides I-Liq Chuan, I would pick Arnis. Arnis has several characteristics I find appealing: it emphasizes partner practice, blends offense and defense, doesn’t require a lot of equipment, has a no-nonsense approach, and most importantly, it just looks fun.

I also like the fact the Arnis is not dependent on physical prowess; skill is a much more important factor for proficiency than size and strength. Swinging two sticks to beat the daylights out of your opponent seems so primal and basic, yet there is subtlety and beauty in the art. To me, it seems like Arnis would develop practical martial skills, enhance the mental ability to read the conditions of offense and defense, and have good skill carry over to other arts.

¤

Coach Michael Joyce – Silat.  But I’m actually going to be very specific with this one.  Over the last few months, I’ve glimpsed numerous martial art video posts (as I enjoy seeing forms progress, applications worked, and maybe pick up on some new training exercises/methods).  One channel really impressed me, as my main draw to the martial arts is the science behind efficient and effective self-defense.  The channel that I came across was Maul565 and the style is Silat Suffian Bela Diri.  Maul Mornie is the instructor and came from Seria, a small town in Brunei Darussalam.  He is currently based in the United Kingdom and does workshops across the country, stressing “Minimum Effort, Maximum Effect.”  My kinda guy!  Can’t wait to learn more about this style through his videos, and perhaps, one day, by him personally.  Check his website out HERE.

¤

DON’T FORGET TO FOLLOW THE COMBATIVE CORNER ON TWITTER

[ HERE ]

%d bloggers like this: