Archive for rape prevention

The Ground Attack Posture from OutFoxxed

Posted in Self-Defense, Techniques, Training, Uncategorized, Women's Self-Defense with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 15, 2016 by chencenter

Since many of the attacks on women are of a sexual nature, we have to know how to fight back from different positions, including from our back!

The “G.A.P.”…

or Ground Attack Posture, is our favorite way of delivering a powerful attack and helping to create space for escape.  Take a look at this short and informative video that we made for you guys and gals!  If you have any questions, please comment on the video or visit our website (blog) for more details.  We have write-ups on each movement/technique we teach in order to improve your understanding.

And if you haven’t already, please subscribe, like and share.

[OutFoxxed Program on YouTube]

Brought to you by: Michael & Jennifer Joyce

Head instructors at the Outfoxxed Program

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10 Questions with Erin Weed

Posted in 10 Questions, Crime, Self-Defense, Violence with tags , , , , , , , on April 20, 2013 by Combative Corner

CombativeCorner Erin Weed

With April being Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention month, we’ve enlisted the help of two amazing females: Erin Weed of Girls Fight Back and Eve Torres of the Gracie’s Women Empowered Program.  Please pass these interviews on via Facebook, Twitter or other social media outlets.  Thank you. 

Interview with Erin Weed of Girls Fight Back

Tell us briefly how you became the teacher and lecturer you are today?

I got certified to teach self-defense shortly after my friend from college was murdered, and created a self-defense educational seminar to connect with young women in high school and college. It’s borderline stand-up comedy, instead of scaring the be-jesus out of them!

After you decided to start, Girls Fight Back, what steps did you go through to get “the ball rolling”?

First step was getting certified in a few different self-defense systems. Next it was teaching the content in a small class setting, followed by creating the GFB seminar and branding it. Then it was a matter of just doing it! I spoke for free at first, but after a bit reached out to a speakers bureau to help with getting paid for the engagements, and actually making it my living. After 8 years of speaking and living on airplanes, I trained a team of speakers in the USA – then one in Pakistan and India – to give the presentation as well. I believe our ideas and our content should be scalable to reach more people.

In your opinion, what is the best way to “light the fire” of awareness to rape, assault, abuse etc?

Frankly, I think people teaching any sort of tough issue like violence need to understand marketing and how to connect with their audience. Meaning, you try to match the tone and content you’re delivering for the people you are trying to connect with. So if you’re talking to corporate women about rape, then really understand – what are their fears, their concerns and the crimes most likely to be committed against them? And on the flip side, how do they WANT to feel? (Note: This is the opposite of how most self-defense programs market themselves. They use fear as their marketing, which is a big mistake when people really WANT to feel at ease! Do you buy toothpaste because it uses the fear of tooth decay as their strategy? Probably not – you buy the Crest brand that only uses pictures of sparkly, white, desirable teeth.) Once you really know your audience, meet them where they are by motivating in a way that doesn’t cause resistance.

In teaching self-defense, what’s one essential lesson you hope all your students walk out with?

To believe in themselves and what they are capable of. I know some teachers call this “false confidence” but I think without confidence (fake or not!), any self-defense skills a woman has will be useless because she won’t have the conviction to execute. Many women and girls struggle with permission in all areas of their lives. If a teacher gives them permission to fight, and permission to believe they are worth fighting for – well that’s when the success stories start rolling in.

Is there one specific technique that you wish all women knew? What is it and why?

If all women trusted their intuition the moment it spoke to them, I think our statistics would plummet. Once it gets physical, the attack is on – and I’d always rather we use techniques that aren’t physical if possible. The challenge for teachers is to really teach intuition is a hardcore skill, and not just skim over it because it’s more fun to teach eye jabs.

As someone well-studied under Gavin de Becker, how must we view Fear?

This answer is probably not surprising with Gavin and his staff as some of our biggest advisors and mentors – View fear as a gift! Many people fear their fear, because if fear is present, something “bad” is probably happening. I think by teaching self-defense, we’re also helping people imagine the worst – thereby liberating them from the paralysis that can occur when the worst actually becomes reality.

With this understanding of Fear, how can we diminish, exercise, control and/or channel this Fear?

Immediate acceptance is key. Instead of fearing fear, or resisting/denying fear (and the situation that caused it) just saying to oneself: “OK. This is happening. I know what to do.” Keeping our responses as simple as owning the experience, staying present and having confidence is the best way to go.

It is common to hear a self-defense instructor say,

“Run from danger, but if you can’t Fight.”

Easier said than done. How do you teach the process of “Action”… of “Fighting Back” into your students?

I teach with options, but no judgement. I call this teaching format “the slippery slope.” Really take them on a journey, step by little step, that violent acts actually happen. (Example: OK, you got a weird feeling about this guy, here’s some options. OK, now that guy starts following you, so here’s some options. Trust yourself. OK, now that guy is full-on chasing you, so here’s some options. Trust yourself.) This helps them ease into the scariness of these situations, which aids in not triggering or paralyzing people. Tiny bits of simple is better than overwhelming amounts of awesome. But it also gives people the chance to thwart a situation before it’s a full-blown assault by seeing the signs were the situation is going long beforehand.

What are your views on weapon training? Do you instruct your students to ever engage or “Fight Back” when someone is holding a knife, gun or club?

I tell people to follow their intuition, and to get training in weapons defense. I think it’s a skill everyone should know, and refrain from giving “cookie cutter” advice. I personally have done a lot of weapons training, and I’m so glad I have those skills. I don’t personally teach that content in GFB seminars (because we don’t have the proper time or venue), but I always encourage our audience learn more. Options and knowledge are power.

What does Erin enjoy doing when she’s not “working”

Hot yoga, any outdoorsy activity in Colorado and roller derby!

Bonus:

What is just one of your goals in the next 5 years? (This can be ANYTHING!)

We will soon be announcing a train-the-trainer program, so anyone in the world can teach Girls Fight Back content to audiences as a public speaker. I’m really excited to share our approach with more self-defense teachers that would like to do more public speaking as an income source, or just another way to impact women. If your readers are interested, they can sign up to receive notification when it’s officially announced here:

http://bit.ly/L9sCge

Thank you Erin!

For more information on Erin Weed, do so by visiting her website at GirlsFightBack.Com.

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Ten Titles For Women Learning Self-Defense

Posted in Discussion Question, Self-Defense, Teaching Topic, Videos with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 20, 2012 by Combative Corner

Throughout film and television history, there has been much in the way of “Violence as entertainment.”  Many action and horror movies actually add “computer generated imagery (CGI)” because they feel there isn’t enough blood in their picture already.

From the 1970’s to the present, the (often-considered) “taboo” element of violence against women is introduced to the viewing public through the medium of film and television. While some of these titles (listed below) may glorify violence, or even promote revenge, there is (in many self-defense professional’s opinions) merit in viewing these frightening scenes.  If you choose to view any of the titles below, we ask that you view them constructively.

Consider what the character may have done inadequately, ineffectively or not-at-all and (if the scene warrants) what they did effectively.  Ask yourself what you would have done in the same or similar situation.  We know that “Situation dictates response,” but there is benefit in knowing the “face” of violence, the ploys of the assailant, the options available and in exploring (at least in a small way) the fears and emotions associated with the victim.

THE LIST

*Each Title is linked to their IMDB page. 

*A ^ denotes a Combative Corner article has been written on it.

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Sexual Assault Prevention | Straw Dogs [2011]

Posted in Discussion Question, Safety, Self-Defense, Teaching Topic, Videos, Violence with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 10, 2012 by Combative Corner

Every so often a film comes around, like this remake of Sam Peckinpah’s 1971 film Straw Dogs, where the viewer witnesses a scene (of which the above clip is just a short sample of) that not only creates a great deal of uneasiness, but of shock and fear.

The Combative Corner would like to thank, Rener Gracie for responding promptly to our request for feedback.  As many of you know, Rener  just recently produced the dvd training series, Women Empowered.  T.J. Kennedy is a self-defense instructor, contributing writer and founder/head instructor of Hybrid Fighting Method Global.  Michael Joyce is also a self-defense instructor, founder/head writer for the Combative Corner and head instructor of the Outfoxxed Program (specializing in Women’s Safety).

RENER GRACIE : WOMEN EMPOWERED

1. Close the door, lock it, and call the police.
2. If he gets in, get out of the house and get help.
3. If he pins you and you can’t get away, feign compliance and then use the Triangle Choke (Lesson 10, Giant Killer Variation) to render him unconscious with your legs when the opportunity arises.

Overall, remaining calm, feigning compliance, saving energy and looking for the best window of escape will catch him off guard and give the best chance of success.

Most Common Mistake: Trying to use violent strikes to incapacitate him which will only burn energy and make him angrier. (click here)

T.J. KENNEDY : HFM GLOBAL

In my opinion, Kate’s character could have had a chance. I have never been in this particular type of situation, but I can say with confidence that she likely had a lot of fear to work through – which makes any physical task difficult.

The only real chance I see for her here is to cause some heavy trauma to high value targets (eg. knee to groin), maybe even using objects around her as improvised weapons (eg. the glass dish on the coffee table to his face). She may have been able to flee to another room (adjacent kitchen) to get more “fatal” implements such as a knife or scissors.

And then running, and if there was a functional vehicle outside to leave ASAP to either her husband or the authorities.

MICHAEL JOYCEOUTFOXXED PROGRAM

The situation presented above is a frightening one and similar to what many women envision.  When I ask my students to imagine this and play the scenario out in their head you can see a lot of things change: their posture, the way they breath, etc.

The first step is to prepare.  Women should seek a self-defense class that teaches realistic and practical means of avoidance, escape and defense… and moreso, they need to continue to hone these skills.  Secondly, beyond the knowledge & skillset that you may acquire in a class, men and women both should mentally prepare.  Do run-throughs of various scenarios whereby you enact your gameplan smoothly and successfully.  Don’t superimpose yourself in the role that Kate is playing, superimpose yourself in the actions that Kate should have been making.

But let’s say she didn’t do any of the above.  When her assailant braces the door with his foot, it is imperative that she braces with her foot as well (barefoot or not).  If there is a wall, pillar or something heavy that she can post against (to leverage her strength), you should always use it.  If the scenario then plays out that he tries to batter the door down with force, a well-timed opening of the door will have your opponent either off-balance or falling through the doorway, (possibly) leaving you a chance for escape.  I concur with T.J. about the knee to the groin (when he’s in close range), but she would either need to follow-up fast with an improvised weapon, run to a safe location (seek authorities), or finish the fight.  Still risky, especially as terrified and under-confident as she is in the film.

There are no guarantees, but the woman (or training student) must use her own judgement, be decisive and use 100% determination.  Rener is correct in saying that in situations of this nature, when you are going up against bigger, stronger opponents feigning compliance may open a larger window of opportunity than if you struggle and deplete your energy stores.  A well-executed triangle choke with the legs is a fair-good bet.  [future article on this later]  You should be confident in your technique however, which always boils down to training!  Keep training, and stay safe everyone!

IF YOU HAVE ANYTHING YOU’D LIKE TO ADD

(Please commit in the box below)

RELATED POST:  NEVER GET TIED UP | LOOK AT THE FILM “ZODIAC”

10 Questions with Steve Kardian

Posted in 10 Questions, Self-Defense, Videos with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 19, 2011 by Combative Corner

Steve Kardian is, perhaps, the nation’s most sought-after expert in the field of women’s safety, crime prevention and risk reduction.  Michael Joyce of the CombativeCorner got to sit down with Steve (via Skype) and ask him the questions that YOU wanted to hear.  For more information on Steve, visit his website by clicking on his picture above.  For his Youtube Channel [click here] Twitter [here].  Watch the full interview (below) or here.

BONUS QUESTION

“A predator has a gun on you, what model should you follow (look away/comply/etc)?”

The worst thing you can do is make eye contact in such a way that the predator perceives it as a challenge.  Remember, you’re dealing with a different element… someone’s got a weapon on you or if robbery is their motive you’re making a business transaction.

If you show fear and he picks up on that fear, you’re in deep trouble.  I’ve interviewed murders; people that have killed people because thy have begged for their life.  They see it as such as weakness.  In prison it’s a badge of honor to kill – in their mind ‘some weak punk’ that begs for his life.  So every situation is different.  It’s hard to give a general answer, but I’ll give an example of what I tell the women –

They’re like, “Well, I know I’m walking down the street” and “I know I feel that somebody’s watching me.”  And we know it only takes 7 seconds for a predator to come on the scene and identify his soft target.

So as you walk by, give him a glance, NOT a stare.  It could be perceived as a challenge.  By doing so, you eliminate about 50% of his game, which is the element of surprise.  And then, when you walk past, just glance back – you don’t even have to look at him, just let him know that you know he’s there.

Again, every situation is different.  If he’s in front of you, make it a business transaction.  It’s a robbery, give him your money, but never ever, EVER allow him to buy you or take you to a secondary location.  The results are unforgiven.

FULL INTERVIEW

For more on this question…

look for our Roundtable Discussion coming in March!

 

 

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