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Another Amazing Year for Interviews

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , on March 4, 2018 by Combative Corner

This year has gotten off to a great start.  Due to our previous success, the ease of social media, and a little bit of luck… we’ve been granted several great interviews for 2018.  One might think by looking at our long list of interviewees, who else could we possibly add?  Try this on for size – former Olympic fencing champion Andrea Baldini!  We’ll also have Polish Saber extraordinaire, Krzysztof Sieniawski and Kung fu expert Nasser Butt.  We also have a couple more that will spring up… but we’ll just leave those a surprise for now!

If you haven’t already, make sure to follow us on Instagram.


Use of Forcillo

Posted in Crime, Miscellaneous, News, Training, Violence with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 26, 2016 by hybridfightingmethod


photo credit: The Toronto Star

I have so much to say since Toronto Police Service’s Constable James Forcillo was convicted of attempted murder in the 2013 shooting death of 18-year-old Sammy Yatim.  I’m prepared to be a pariah, as I may be seen that way after expressing my opinion.

A quick history

Yatim was on a Toronto streetcar, high as a kite, and whipped his penis out and started masturbating in front of a group of women in the back of the streetcar.  He then took a switchblade (illegal in Canada) and attempted to slash one of the girl’s throats. She managed to block the attack with her purse. Moments later everyone from the streetcar emptied onto the street, leaving Yatim on the streetcar pacing back and forth alone, still with knife in hand.

When police arrived, Yatim was screaming things at them, like “pussies” and “pigs”, while the responding officers repeatedly commanded him to drop the knife. Instead of complying Yatim, advanced on the officers, and was subsequently shot 9 times and killed.

There are a few sticking points that I’d like to talk about, as this situation has caused significant public outcry in defense of Sammy Yatim and criticism of Toronto Police – specifically James Forcillo.

Some of the things that the public say were uncalled for were:

  1. Shooting Yatim in the first place instead of many other force options (eg. bean bag shotgun, tazers, riot shields, etc.)
  2. Shooting Yatim several times after he was already shot and downed.
  3. A reminder that James Forcillo had drawn his firearm 12 times while on duty in the last 3 years.

I would like to suggest that unless you’ve had a knife pulled on you or seen what a knife can do, you have no clue what you’re talking about (and the jury probably also had no clue). You don’t grasp the magnitude of danger a knife-wielding assailant poses; Nor how much that danger can be enhanced when the assailant is drugged or mentally ill.

Mental illness and substance abuse make someone unpredictable. Think about how you might react to a situation like this if you were the first office on scene.

You’re responding to a call about a knife-wielding attacker on a streetcar. When you arrive the attacker still has his knife in hand, taunting you while your firearm is drawn and pointed at him.  Every command you issue to drop the knife is met with “fuck you pussy”, ” fucking pig.” Then he advances. What would you do?

A knife is lethal force. Yatim demonstrated intent and ability to kill (again, knife still in hand while advancing).  Because of this, after 5 days of jury deliberation, the original charges of 2nd degree homicide and manslaughter were dismissed.  As Forcillo did, however, get convicted of attempted murder – and due to the severity of this charge – the lesser charge of aggravated assault was dropped.

Security camera footage from the streetcar now released to the public shows police entering the streetcar after the shots were fired, and kicking the knife out of Yatim’s hand. This occurred after the extra shots were fired once Yatim was already downed.

Excited delirium is a condition that has allowed many criminals to have superhuman strength, and in some cases take shotgun blasts or multiple revolver shots and still fight until they bleed out. If Yatim was down, but still had a knife in his hand (again, the officer kicked it away upon entry), he could have potentially stabbed an officer, possibly in the femoral artery. A stab wound to the femoral artery has the potential to be fatal in minutes. This isn’t a far-fetched conclusion.

Ontario Use of ForceUse of Force

For those that say that the officer was too quick to shoot, should have backed up and increased the distance, don’t understand real violence and intent.  You advance on a threat, removing their capacity to attack. Giving them more space is irresponsible, as it gives the assailant more opportunity to attack.

The chances of a bullet passing through and hitting a bystander increases if Yatim was let out of the streetcar.

As for tazing him, only police supervisors are equipped with Tasers. Forcillo is not a supervisor; a Taser was not an immediate option.

Wait for riot shields and board the streetcar?  Haven’t seen the movie 300 have you?  The first officer through the door is the first casualty, usually suffering the first stab or slash wound.

Bean bag shotgun?  Knife is lethal force.  And Forcillo didn’t have one at his disposal.

“Police in the UK don’t shoot and take threats down with pepper spray.” Because they don’t have guns, and I bet your tune would change when UK cops get mowed down by semi and fully automatic weapons that criminals don’t seem to mind using.

As for Forcillo’s history of pulling out his firearm, let’s look at this logically. If an average police officer works a 40-hr. week (likely probably more), and responds to 3 calls a day, that means in a 5-day work week an average officer responds to 15 calls a week. If you take two weeks out for vacation, that’s about 750 calls a year. In three years that’s 2250 calls. This is an conservative estimate. So, Forcillo drew his firearm 12 out of 2250 times.  That means his gun came out in 0.5% of his calls (we already know this is a conservative estimate).  With the increase in Toronto gun and knife crime, how unreasonable does that sound to you?  In my view, it sounds very reasonable. Trigger happy?  I think not, for a frontline officer.

Final Thoughts

I don’t care about bleeding hearts and compassion here. The fact remains that a disturbed person tried to sexually assault, injure, or kill another human being.When told by police to drop his weapon, he taunted them and advanced, leading to his death. To be sure he was no longer a threat, Forcillo shot him (as the first responder, Forcillo was lead officer; he was on point and everyone else was to follow suit) several more times. Again, the onus was on Forcillo to act, and he did for his own safety, for the safety of his colleagues, and for the safety of the public waiting on the street.

On top of all of this, we have to remember that police are not immune to the shitstorm of a limbic system “fight or flight” response; causing loss of logical thought, and loss of a large portion of motor skill.

I believe James Forcillo acted appropriately, even if a judge and jury didn’t come to that conclusion.

It’s a sad day for justice. In fact, there is no justice here. The only justice occurred in 2013 when a young monster was stopped before he had a chance to became an older monster.

I know most will still be critics and use of force “experts” from the comfort of their couches and office jobs, while police will still go out every day and face the risk of death to protect those critics. That is why they are heroes.

Below are video links and the Canadian National Use-of-Force Model you can observe to help you make up your own mind:


Sammy Yatim’s chilling final moments released

Preview YouTube video Toronto Streetcar shooting July 2013 CCTV Security Footage Sammy Yatim

Toronto Streetcar shooting July 2013 CCTV Security Footage Sammy Yatim

Preview YouTube video Toronto officer’s trial sees video of Sammy Yatim shooting

Toronto officer’s trial sees video of Sammy Yatim shooting

Preview YouTube video Sammy Yatim Shooting – TTC Streetcar Audio and Multiple Video Views – Const. James Forcillo Trial

Sammy Yatim Shooting – TTC Streetcar Audio and Multiple Video Views – Const. James Forcillo Trial

Preview YouTube video TTC surveillance camera 4

CombativeCorner Turns 2 Years Old!

Posted in Miscellaneous, News with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2012 by Combative Corner

Joyce  |  This has truly been… and continues to be, a wonderful journey.  I want to thank all of our readers, our Combative Corner family for making these 2 years seem like 2 days.  The martial arts is a bottomless well, and with each fetching of water, I hope everyone continues to wet their lips.  The Combative Corner was founded on April 1st, 2010 and is one thing I deeply treasure, but not as much as the friends I’ve made.  A deep thank you to our Combative Crew: Vaughn, Kuo, Lara, Lee and Kennedy and a special thank you for each and every one of our “extended” family wherever you may be.  Cheers!  Oss, Michael Joyce (CombativeCorner.Com founderTwitter  |  Facebook

|  Lee  | My thoughts on the “Combative Corner” reminds me so much of the Martial Arts club I had founded in Purdue University from the years of 2000-2004 called “Fighters United.” The goal of the club was to bring together many talented Martial Artists in order to learn from one another. I see that Combative Corner aims to do the same in the online world. But great talent usually also comes with great ego. Without a Master, you have a bunch of students fighting amongst one another to prove who is right. When you gather a bunch of Masters together, now you may have a bunch of Masters fighting amongst one another to prove who is right. But a true Master does not fight; those that do fight are not Masters.

True Masters know the truth within & they do not need to express it with any words, they simply lead by example. Combative Corner aims to bring together Masters in order to share & learn from one another. YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia, & the internet in general bring people together on a large scale. Combative Corner creates a smaller close knit community so that there is a closer connection amongst those involved. YouTube is like a University, Combative Corner is like a Fraternity within the University. Yes you can make lifelong friends while attending a University, but if you join a group within the University that promotes a strong brotherhood, it will increase your chances of creating everlasting friends. Combative Corner aims to be the place where you immediately connect with true Masters of the Martial Arts, there is a regulator to control who is qualified & who is not. On YouTube & the internet in general, there is no regulator. Without a regulator, it will be very difficult for the novice to determine whether or not a Master is true or false.

|  Kennedy  |  The one thing I love about the CC above all else that I love about the CC is it`s lack of politics. Drama free….makes life so much easier. Kudos to MJ for running it that way. It makes me proud to be a part of it.

|  Kuo  |  Combative Corner has a unique feel. Michael has managed to get a diverse bunch of martial artists with different viewpoints together and express their thoughts in a civil manner. What has come out of this grand experiment is interesting posts and discussions covering a range of topics. All the while, things have not devolved into flame wars and name calling, which is all too common on the internet, especially when you get opinionated martial artists in the same forum.

As a group, we are not a mutual admiration society just restating the same opinion. We are also not a reality-show clash of personalities. The fact that different perspectives can get expressed without politics or personality clashes taking over is a tribute to both the contributors and to MJ for fostering a constructive environment at Combative Corner.

|  Vaughn  |  Anytime there is a chance for martial artists to come together and share their knowledge and experience with no bias towards style, age, years training or personal beliefs I think it is a great thing.
I was and still am honored to have asked to have been apart of it.
We are truly doing something great at the combative corner and I want to thank Michael for starting it all and bring us all together to not only share what we have learned with the masses but with each other as well. Let’s keep it going.
Happy Anniversary Combative Corner!

|  Lara  |  I feel this is a great honor to be able to share our arts with each other as well as view points. Without it we will never grow.  I have learned so much from my fellow Martial artist here as well. Thank you to each one of you for your fine posts! I look forward to many more years of growth here together at COMBATIVE CORNER.  Rei,  Robert Lara Shihan

Please let us know what you think of us in the comment space below!

What was your favorite article or interview perhaps? What do you hope to see more of in the future?

The lines are open.

Roundtable Discussion 013 : Cage-Fighting Kids

Posted in Discussion Question, MMA, Roundtable Discussion with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 29, 2011 by Combative Corner

“What are your thoughts on the ‘Cage-Fighting Kids’ controversy?”

…Should kids be allowed to continue to “Cage Fight”?

We at the Combative Corner look forward to reading your comments! Please post them at the bottom of the article.

disagree: I don’t know if it’s my old age or what, but most of what I see is what is going on underneath; parents refusing to grow up.  When I was speaking to my friend about this the other day, we shared the exact thought:”Grown ups” these days are nowhere near the grown-ups of yester-years.  Everything that an adult may do in their free time doesn’t have to be shared by the child.  An adult for example my choose to drink, smoke, seek a sexual partner, or any number of things in dance clubs, bars and entertainment venues.  The location of these cage-fighting events are in such a place.  As for the activities that go in such places, you would not wish (at least I hope you wouldn’t) to expose a child to this environment and/or the goings-on that occur in said environment.

Nothing against mixed martial arts and/or cage fighting competitions, but leave it to those mature enough to understand for themselves what they are getting into.  Children will always want to emulate athletes or figures in popularized sports (such as MMA) but let’s make sure we are able to keep them safe (proper equipment, responsible refereeing), and expose them to an atmosphere that fosters (friendly) competition; not one that resembles a gladiator’s arena, or worse, prison.  If families want to cheer their children on, they can do so in various judo or jiu-jitsu dojos the world over, or in their own backyard under the watchful eye of their parent(s).

disagree: “Cage Fighting Kids” This is not a surprise to me, I knew it was going to head towards this. The kids follow adults. Kids will do what adults do. Just as it looks shameful for kids to fight in a cage, so too does it look shameful for adults to fight in a cage. It is a disgrace to Martial Arts, it’s a disgrace to the intelligence of human beings. Animals may fight in a cage, but human beings are supposed to be beyond the intelligence of animals.

As a society we are going backwards, not forwards in our progression in intelligence. Children are following in our footsteps and we are clearly setting a bad example. Don’t blame the children, blame the adults, blame the society, blame the people, & blame the government for not stepping in to do something about it. It is political, the government will be paid off to allow this type of organized violence, like alcohol & cigarettes, the government is banking off of cage fighting, & it does not look like it will stop.

Adults have become more violent & therefore children will become more violent. This is not a beautiful expression of Martial Art, it is a violent ugly expression. Children should be wrestling while smiling & giggling, they should be play fighting like what they do in WWE, all for fun, not out of real anger or violence. Anytime your aim is to hurt somebody, to put somebody else in pain out of anger, that is not Art, that is hate, it can be seen in all sorts of competitive fighting, not just in the cage.

disagree: What is my personal stance on these “Cage Fighting Kids”? People will do anything for money. I do not watch or care for cage matches as that is a sport. I understand that adults choose to fight in there and that is fine. But to out your Child in DANGER is more then a cause for this to be looked into deeply by Law enforcement. I do not call any of this Martial Arts. I call this a shame.


agree: If it were a fight, then I would be upset that there was no protective equipment. However, it was not a fight. It was a grappling match. I really don’t understand the uproar or how it is dangerous or a bad idea.

I think our young boys and girls, especially in North America, have been “pussified” and are in need of this kind of physical activity. To compete, as grapplers, can be very beneficial to a child’s self-esteem and self-confidence. Grappling is fun and it can teach you a lot about yourself. It also requires a lot of discipline to get good at it.

There is no shame in what these kids did, and no shame in their parents allowing it. I personally think that it takes a certain amount of bravery to subject yourself to this kind of public scrutiny. And the kids…hell, there is no questioning their bravery.

There is also, on a spiritual note, a state of consciousness that is experienced in the ring that is ineffable. And unless a person has been in that position, he or she cannot understand it. Not to sound flaky, but if you’ve ever competed in a ring or a cage you know what I’m talking about. And this ineffable thing I am talking about was a critical experience in the evolution of my own consciousness.

With much deep respect to my colleagues here at the Combative Corner, I can see that I stray from the commonly shared value system in this regard. Although what I teach is not meant for sport, but for incapacitation or elimination of a threat, I would be honoured if any of my students decided to fight in a ring or a cage. I would support them 100% and I would be their #1 fan. And if I had a child, and he or she decided to train and compete like these kids did…I would be there every day to motivate, encourage, and build my child to be the best person he or she could be, and the best grappler he or she could be. And I would be the loudest cheerleader you’be ever heard.

somewhat disagree: I have objections to the “cage fighting” kids event, but not because the event was a serious danger to the kids. It was largely a grappling match, and even if there was striking, kids at that age are not really strong enough to seriously injure each other. The one potential safety issue is that the kids were not wearing head guards. A sprung ring floor (or possibly the support posts of the cage) can still cause a jarring impact to a child’s head. Kids may be resilient, but rattling the brain around can have serious developmental implications.

What is disturbing about the match was that it seemed staged for the spectacle. The event was not a kid-centric affair; it was ticket-holder only, and featured primarily real cage fighting with adults. The commentary from the announcers made it clear that the kids event was more about entertaining the audience than building character in the kids. Even though it was technically a grappling match, the kids event was in every other aspect like an actual cage fight. It makes you wonder if the event was a misguided glorification of combat sports or if the parents were vicariously living out their fantasies of fighting in the cage. The kids cage fight looks like a show for the amusement of the audience and for the profit of the sponsoring club.

somewhat disagree: While I agree that this was more of a grappling match than an actual MMA fight I still have issues with the way the two boys seem to be put on display for the people there to see the main event. It’s one thing to let a kid compete in a grappling tournament and to be cheered on by their parents, classmates and peers but it is another thing entirely to put them on display as part of an opening act to a main event.

The parents of the two boys competing in the “Cage Fight” are just like any other sports mom or dad that sees some talent in their child and instead of nurturing and encouraging it in a “normal” way go
overboard.  I personally don’t have a problem with the sport of Mixed Martial Arts and think that there are some very talented athletes that compete in the sport as well as some that give it a bad name which can be true of any sport.  I know the popularity of MMA is growing fast and with it the inevitability that children will become interested in it but I think that there are some things that should be just for adults.


This article was written by the above authors/professional martial art instructors after viewing the following video


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