Archive for martial arts

Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Advance, NC

Posted in Jiujitsu, Miscellaneous, News, OFFERS with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 27, 2017 by bradvaughn

gjj-advance-promoGracie JuiJitsu is located at 160 Webb Way in Advance, North Carolina.  Contact Brandon Vaughn and advantage of their 10-Day Free Trial.

The Footwork of Silat

Posted in Silat, Videos with tags , , , , , , , , on December 13, 2016 by Combative Corner

Why do SSBD move the way we move?

maul-mornie-1This is why we have footsweeps and ankle breaks in Bruneian Martial Arts. Why we are mobile but rooted and we dont emphasis to much on low stance in application, only in training. We don’t stomp and we don’t jump.

Traditionally Bruneians live on water villages along the Bruneian river for more then 700 years. Marco Polo once stopped over in Brunei ports and said Brunei was like “The Venice of the East”.  There were more than 31 villages that existed once on the water village.  Royalty, Nobility, traders, commoners lived on the water villages.  Farmers live on land, of course. 

The bridges and pathways are the place to test your skills.

The footsweeps are to trip your opponents off the bridge, the ankle breaks are to make sure they can’t swim when the fall off the bridge.

Foot traps are just take downs when done on solid ground, that is all it is, a take down.  He stands back up and he can keep on fighting you.  Foot traps when done on a bridge over water, you break their ankle, they fall in the water and they struggle to swim and they (can) drown.

Not many knows what real footsweeps and ankle traps are for.  In Brunei we do it because it is a part of our environment.  The environment created the fighting system, it’s not there because it’s cool.  No other can claim this.  That is why we move the way we move.

SSBD is a traditional art.  We move like the old ways because it is effective and efficient.

Maul Mornie.

*entry from 12/10/2016, Facebook profile

*SSBD stands for Silat Suffian Bela Diri

Superb Demonstration of Silat & Arnis

Posted in Arnis, Silat, Training, Weapons with tags , , , , , , on June 6, 2014 by Combative Corner

Evan Tai owns a kick boxing gym in Hong Kong and occasionally trains with Silat expert Maul Mornie (when he’s in HK).  Obviously, after viewing these clips you’ll be able to see the caliber of martial artist this young man is [Tai].  Enjoy!

CombativeCorner.Com

*Evan Tai’s YouTube Channel : Eskrimamate

Martial Methodologies : by Jamen Zacharias

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on December 3, 2013 by Combative Corner

ImageMartial methodologies, I feel, should lead towards potent and effective manipulation of force and energy, as well as an increase in intelligent behaviour, rather then the collection of techniques, the stock piling of drills and reliance on the attributes of the lower impulses. By this, the ‘control of force’ becomes possible and by default, the ethically minded are in a greater condition to direct force and energy according to the precepts of justice and nobility.

Training to express the ego, or to bring forth so called ‘street justice’, is not the goal, yet when one gains an expertise in the manipulation of force, like any other power or weapon, the potential to do harm exists.

This is why science and the precepts of true divine guidance, must go hand in hand. They are not in conflict with one another, but rather exist to co-exist, to work in harmony and to achieve height’s unattainable if left to themselves within any individual or society.

Martial Arts, I truly believe, even with all of its gains, all of its advancements past and present, are still, yet to achieve its highest potentialities.

This is because we as human beings, the vessels from which these wondrous sciences and arts immerge, have yet to discover ‘collectively’, our deepest, most noble motivations. When we do, ‘we as a society’, will bring these profound advancements forth.

– Jamen Zacharias, Author “The Science of Offsetting

 Originally posted on Facebook December 3, 2013

Sifu Lee on Children & the Martial Arts

Posted in Day's Lesson, Martial Arts, Miscellaneous, Peace & Wellbeing, Teaching Topic, Training with tags , , , , , , , on August 8, 2013 by Sifu Freddie Lee

Children Kids Class Education KindergartenI cannot force my children to practice Martial Arts.

That is against the Tao. 

If it comes natural, let it be, if it does not, let it be.  My children will have to exercise, practice good hygiene, eat healthy, and sleep well.  Those are necessities that they have no choice in fulfilling.  We live the healthy way, so my children have no other choice but to follow.  The fridge is only filled with healthy foods, there is nothing else to eat.  It is either eat healthy or starve.

They are forced to brush their teeth and take showers even when they don’t want to, it is a necessity of health and wellness.  The lights go out at a certain time so they have no other choice but to sleep when it is time.  They exercise because there simply is nothing else to do.  We have no cable TV to watch.  We have movies, but movies get old.  They play online games, but eventually they have to stop and move around.  They want to go to the park to play, when they go to the park, that is the beginning of their physical training.  Even at home they are very active running and playfully wrestling.

Activeness is extremely important.  The must be active.  But as far as formal exercise training, like in the beginning stages of Martial Art training, I do not force but I encourage.  They know they will make us happy when they participate, knowing this encourages them to get involved.  I also notice that when other children are around taking the training serious, they tend to get more involved.

Freddie Lee pinterestBrandon loves playing XBox 360.  We have an agreement that if he practices Kung Fu for 1 hour, he can play Xbox, and this agreement is working wonders.  It really motivates him to get involved with the training.  Angelina naturally loves to train and does not need video games as a motivation.  Brandon and Angelina enjoy spending time with me and that is what makes them want to participate.

The kwoon is also separated from our home.  Taking them to the kwoon creates a separate environment that also motivates them.  Staying at home all day makes a child want to get out and be somewhere new.  The kwoon becomes a quick getaway to do something exciting and different, this helps a great deal.  Keo does get involved as well, but he is not as motivated as Brandon and Angelina because he is still a bit young and does not have as much energy as Brandon and Angelina.  Jet is the only one that is unable to participate in anyway because of his extreme lack of focus and attention span.

I see that it is very important not to force the children to learn Martial Arts; they will learn when they are ready.  If they experience great struggle in life, it may encourage them to learn when they wonder why they are having such a difficult time overcoming these struggles.  Sometimes it will take a child getting bullied or beat up in school in order for him to realize that he needs to take action and get started in something like Martial Arts to defend himself when necessary.

It is of absolute necessity that children learn to be healthy and nonviolent.  If they are able to live a peaceful life, they may never find a need to learn Martial Arts at all.  But if they are surrounded by struggle and conflict, Martial Art training may very well end up becoming a necessity.  It depends on each child’s circumstances.  It is not right for a parent to force a child to practice an Art that he/she does not enjoy.

If he would rather play the drums or read, let him do so.  But no matter what he chooses, he must find time to exercise.  Exercise is something that I will always enforce, because him refusing to do so is no other reason than just pure laziness.  When a child is being lazy, you must teach him the way to combat this laziness and become active.  When a child is continuously active, Martial Art training will come on its own natural way that is unforced.

Sincerely,

Sifu Freddie Lee

Freddie’s Modern Kungfu. Chicago, IL.

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10 Questions with Eve Torres

Posted in 10 Questions, Jiujitsu, Safety, Self-Defense, Violence with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 28, 2013 by Combative Corner

Eve Torres CombativeCornerEve Torres is not your typical lady – she’s a dancer, model, actress, former professional wrestler (3-time WWE Divas Champion) and now, instructor of the Gracie’s Women Empowered Program

(Combative Corner DVD Review). Click image below to watch.

I had to honor of linking up with her on Skype for an exclusive 10 Question Interview.  Watch and listen as we find out more about Eve and her new-found direction.

Stay in the loop.  Follow the Combative Corner on Facebook & Twitter.

Interviewer: Michael Joyce

*Photos Above used with the Permission of Ms. Eve Marie Torres

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Kuo on “What is Martial Art” : RTD 018

Posted in Day's Lesson, Discussion Question, Martial Arts, Philosophy with tags , , , , , on January 16, 2013 by mindbodykungfu

Kuo1

“Art” is one of those hard-to-define words which means different things to different people. Most people tend to think of the fine arts (painting, sculpture, dance, theater, etc) when “art” is brought up in conversation. In my opinion, art encompasses any endeavor which requires skill and is an expression of the artist. Both the fine arts and the martial arts require refined skills and are a creative expression of the artists.

Human nature has violent and physical aspects, so it only natural that there are art forms set in the context of fighting. What separates the martial “art” from mindless brawling is the systematization of the fighting such that the movements and principles of fighting can be trained without violence necessarily being the end goal. When such a systematization is present, the martial artists can train the craft of fighting and express the principles of a martial arts style in their movements. Watching martial artists who have mastered their craft is similar to watching the skillful movements of a dancer or an athlete competing at peak performance. By blending with an opponent’s attacks and weaving offense and defense, the martial artist is demonstrating a beautiful display of body movement and force interplay.

The practice of martial arts is a physical expression of the practitioner’s self. You can perceive actors performing with feeling, athletes competing with heart, and painters creating with vision. You can also tell the difference between martial practitioners moving with rote, reflexive patterns and the skillful artists moving with intent and dynamically adapting to their opponents. With skilled martial artists, the hours of deliberate practice shine through with efficient movements, powerful attacks, solid defense, clear perception of an opponent’s attacks, and an exquisite sense of timing and distance. The martial artist elevates fighting to a skilled craft.

Coming from a primarily Chinese martial arts background, I also believe another defining characteristic of martial arts is that they are a path to self-improvement. At the most basic level, martial arts training develops focus, discipline, physical conditioning, and camaraderie. However, the self-improvement to which I am referring is the (perhaps cliched) life-altering, fundamental truth-realizing types of change. To pursue a martial art to a high level–or any serious endeavor for that matter–one has to devote a lot of time and effort. That in and of itself cuts off a lot of other life possibilities since time and energy and unfortunately limited resources. While on the path to mastery, martial artists must ask themselves if the art is something they truly wish to pursue and what sacrifices they are willing to make to achieve their goal. They must determine who they are, who they want to be, and what they want out of life before they can commit to pursuing mastery of an art.

To reach high levels of proficiency with a martial art, the practitioner’s mental acuity must be elevated. Even in high level athletics, physical training is rarely the limiting factor; rather it is the mental game that defines the elite. The martial artist’s mind must be trained to maintain focus, develop a keen kinesthetic feel, and perceive the conditions in a fight. Martial artists must develop mental fortitude to deal with the inevitable roadblocks and setbacks on the path to mastery. To reach their full potential, martial artists need to delve into their own psyches to conquer the mental blocks that hold them back and remove the mental clutter that cloud the understanding of fundamental principles. It is in this process of looking inward that the martial artists realize themselves and grow as people.

A martial art is just like any other art form in that a martial art is a skilled pursuit which expresses aspects of life and humanity. The art can form bonds of friendship, help a person grow, and express beauty through skill. It just happens that the “art” is expressed in the context of fighting instead of the more traditional fine arts media.

Johnny Kuo

Mind Body Kungfu

MORE ON ‘ WHAT IS MARTIAL ART ‘ TO COME!

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