Archive for grappling

Watch and Learn Jiu-Jitsu – By: Ryron Gracie

Posted in Day's Lesson, Jiujitsu, Philosophy, Teaching Topic, Techniques, Training with tags , , , , , , , on December 3, 2013 by Combative Corner

Ryron Gracie - Gracie JiuJitsuA while back I was sparring with Rener and I remember being in danger of a choke. His attack was relentless. I tried every technique that I knew, but the choke kept getting deeper and deeper.  Seeing no other option, I abandoned the idea of pure technique and used everything I had to twist free from the choke. Let me be clear… I was more than close to losing the battle. What kept me from tapping or sleeping was not technique, but a strategic explosion.

Read the Original Article in Full! (HERE)

Q: Is it better to be technical and lose or explosive and survive?

Ryron’s Answer:

Its more efficient and a better investment of your time to be technical and lose. There is value in exploding out of bad situation to safety, it helps you understand what you are physically capable of.  Be aware of the risk of injury , worsening the position and most of all running away from learning the intricacies of jiu-jitsu.

Originally Posted on November 21, 2013 by

Training Tip | By: Ryron Gracie

Posted in Jiujitsu, Training with tags , , , , , on May 14, 2013 by Combative Corner

Ryron Gracie - Gracie JiuJitsuProblem:

Your favorite submission is not working as often as you would like.

Answer:

  • Most people attack with their best submission first.
  • Most often the submission you attempt first does not work.
  • Start attacking all the submissions that are not your favorite.
  • Your opponent has no idea that you do not like those submissions.
  • Use the submissions that are not your favorite to disguise your favorite.
  • Take the submission your opponent gives you.

Ryron Gracie

GracieAcademy.Com

The Journey to Blue Belt in BJJ | JTBB # 1

Posted in Jiujitsu, Martial Arts, Training with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 10, 2012 by chencenter

“I am a shark, the ground is my ocean, and most people don’t know how to swim.”

Jean Jacques Machado

Like many martial artists before me, Brandon and I came to jiu-jitsu by way of the ‘Shark Tank.’  Growing up in the martial arts that were available to us, we learned how to protect ourselves standing up.  For years, in our minds, that’s all that existed in our world, and in our training.  Obviously, when the Gracies came around and the UFC started, we got our glimpse ‘behind the mountain.’  When we finally got to roll with someone with jiujitsu experience, we found ourselves struggling to stay afloat.

Life takes people in different paths.  Brandon came by way of Karate.  I came by way of Taijiquan.  Where the road would lead (for us) would be at ‘Jiu-Jitsu Junction.’ This double-lane road is paved with excitement and we proud and eager to explore this journey with you.

Stay tuned to these articles via Twitter #JTBB

In This New Series…

Together, we will explore the lessons, the pitfalls, the mindset (and more) of the student on the quest to blue belt.  And like every journey, the writings herein are not solely for the beginner.

Those of you experienced in Jiu-Jitsu…

we encourage you to comment, add, and/or reminisce with these posts.

Thanks for reading and enjoy our future posts from our List, or by following this site.  (Bookmarking or Subscribing by email helps)

Brandon Vaughn & Michael Joyce

10 Questions with Keith Owen

Posted in 10 Questions, External Arts, Jiujitsu with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 19, 2012 by Combative Corner

How did you become interested in learning the martial arts?

I grew up in a single parent household and my mom couldn’t make ends meet.  I had wanted to do martial arts since I was 7 but we just couldn’t afford it.  I saw a karate demonstration at my school at that age and knew that I “had” to do martial arts.  I didn’t start taking martial arts lessons until I was 16 when I got a job and started paying for them myself.  I never looked back.  In the early 90’s after I got my black belt in Kung-fu I saw an article on the Gracies and was intrigued.  They were beating up everyone.  Later I saw Royce Gracie tap out Dan Severn with a triangle choke and thought that’s the martial art I need to train in.  I found Professor Pedro Sauer in Salt Lake and I never looked back.

What personally drove you to learning jiujitsu?

A small guy can beat a big guy using technique. Think of what a big guy like me could do using Technique? I thought this was “the way!”
If you had to pick 3 of your favorite techniques, what would they be?
  1. The Fog Choke-Keith Owen “Lights Out”
  2. The Triangle Choke and the 10th Planet “Gansta Lean”
  3. Deep Half Guard
  4. Hip Compression- Keith Owen Favorite Moves Vol 1
  5. The Biermbolo -I’m playing with this-I suck at it
  6. The Twister and the truck-10 Planet
  7. The Eziquel choke-Keith Owen “Lights out” via James Foster
  8. Arm in Guillotine

A little more than three..sorry.

Who are a few of your mentors and what impact have they had on you?

I don’t know about many mentors but I have numerous people who have had a profound effect on me so since you asked I’m going to share.
  1. My Wife Shirlane- 21 years and going strong.  She should have divorced me a long time ago.
  2. Professor Pedro Sauer-The best instructor in the world. He has forgotten more then I know.
  3. Sifu Joesph Cowles- My Wu Wei Instructor and former student of Bruce Lee
  4. Tren Long- One of my purple belts who has produced all of my videos and my toughest student.
  5. Matt Owen (no relation) One of my purple belts.  He and his son Dylan are the rock of my school.
  6. Dean Heileman who got his black belt before he died of Cancer.  Got me motivated in Jiu-Jitsu.
  7. Royce Gracie for showing me “The Way.”
  8. Allen Hopkins-One of the most technical black belts of the Pedro Sauer Association-He helped me out a lot going up the ladder.
  9. Professor Sergio Penha in Las Vegas for being a great example and giving me another perspective of Jiu-Jitsu.
  10. My Mom-The most emotionally tough women I have ever met.

and I’m forgetting my friends, Damon Tong (My business mentor), Rob Smith (one of my instructors) and Rob Namer (my firearms business partner).  I would not be where I am without the help of these people.

How do you feel about martial arts for: the dojo, the street, and for competition? 
You asked about Martial arts and not specifically BJJ so I’m going to give you my opinion of the Martial arts in general.  I think a lot of martial arts are practiced in the dojo and then the instructor brags about how street lethal their martial art is.  They never test anything out to verify.  I often say that most martial arts instructors have four years of martial arts training repeated three or four times over. Competition is a little closer to the street because you are going up against another human being – but the rules of the contest can make a person lose their edge and fight by the rules. For instance,  MMA doesn’t allow groin kicking or eye gouging.  Kicking the guy in the groin and eye gouging are great self defense techniques for the street.  Just look at the guys who get kicked in the groin or eye gouged in MMA they typically need time to recover.  I’m a big fan of martial arts for the street and for competition, you just need to put it in perspective for what you are doing and know that there is a difference.  Just because you have one down doesn’t mean you know the other.

Are you a big fan of competition fighting? Why or why not? (and if so, who do you like to follow)

After having said my previous comments- I love competition bjj and I love MMA.  My favorite BJJ competitors are Marcello, Saulo, Jeff Glover and Roger Gracie.  My favorite MMA fighters are Johny “Bones” Jones, Anderson Silva, Nick and Nate Diaz, Clay Guida and GSP and my son Alex Owen (laughs).

What is your stance and/or concerns about online learning?

Well, since I have a lot of videos and an online download site  (www.keithowenonline.com)   I think it would be a bit hypocritical to say that it’s a bad thing (laughs).  Seriously,  I think the internet has made bjj more accessible then ever to the masses.  It really helps in getting students everywhere better.  I do think that the best way to train for the average person is too have an awesome bjj instructor to show you the technique, then you go to as many seminars as you possibly can and then you top it off with online or video training.  I think that would be the perfect regimen.  This is a great time to be alive and training in BJJ and Martial arts in general.

How effective (do you believe) jiujitsu is in self-protection?

This comment is going to piss a lot of BJJ guys off but Jiu-Jitsu is not my first martial art for the street.  It’s my back-up martial art – done if I’m taken down, slip or take someone down if I get attacked.  The pavement, parking lot, side of the road, gravel, snow, ice, wet grass or a field of stickers is no place to ground fight.  I want to knock that mutha out or be able to evade and escape if a weapon is presented or their is multiple attackers.I also don’t think in many cases that arm bars are very effective in ending a fight in a life or death ground fighting situation.  You could break a dedicated opponents arm and in many cases he could keep on fighting.  It’s far more effective to use some kind of choke that would make an opponent pass out.  I think on the other hand if you are just a stand up fighter and you get taken down then you are in a world of hurt, so Jiu-Jitsu is important but for me it’s my last resort in a real fight. I’m not going to put up my dukes and then run over and jump into the guard (laughs).I would also like to add that the gi is a very effective tool to practice self defense.  Many attackers are wearing coats and pants and the more opportunity you have to choke a dude out, the better.
What elements of jiujitsu would you teach your wife/daughter or loved one for self-protection?

Collar Choke, Arm Bar and Triangle Choke from the Guard because that is where they will likely be in an attack situation.  i know I said that the arm bar wasn’t very effective but it’s hard for an attacker in a rape situation to get aroused when they have a freshly dislocated or broken arm and anyway, the police can have a free clue as to who the attacker was.
What is one thing that you’d like to emphasize to the beginning jiujitsu student?
I don’t have just one but the first “things” I would emphasize is to have fun, play around and get better.  I want my new students to work on getting rid of their ego so that getting better is the goal and not having to win at any cost.  Many guys don’t like to tap out and they take it personal.  They will often quit because they think they are lousy at Jiu-jitsu and since they are lousy it’s no fun.    We also can’t afford injuries at this level because shoulder and knee surgeries are expensive and people’s spouses aren’t too keen on letting them come back after a sever injury, It would be a shame if a potential world champion quit at the beginning because of ego or injury.    I promise that if they get rid of ego, do their best, keep an open mind, come to class, take care of their partners, get addicted to BJJ and stay loyal that I will take them to Black Belt Jiu-Jitsu Mastery, I promise.
Bonus Question
You’ve got 6 months to train… the money is on the table, who would you personally like to “have a go at.” (it could be anybody, living…dead. just a fantasy questions)
I would  train (friendly) with any bjj black belt for free as long as they have good technique.  I would super fight anyone for money though, What the hell (laughs).
·
Mr. Owen, we thank you greatly for giving us this interview. 
Readers – if you’d like to learn more about Mr. Keith Owen, please visit his website by clicking the picture at the top of the page.  For his instructional videos, click here.

Protected: FREE PRIZE #1 – JIU-JITSU E-BOOK

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 16, 2012 by Combative Corner

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Why Is 10th Planet Jiu Jitsu Important To Your Game? By: Ari Knazan

Posted in Jiujitsu, Martial Arts, Styles with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 18, 2012 by Combative Corner

10th Planet Jiu Jitsu is a system of Jiu Jitsu created by Eddie Bravo. Many people confuse this statement in meaning “Eddie has created a new martial art form of twisting and attacking the body.” This article is just one of many that exist on setting the record straight.

As a long time student of Eddie’s and a teacher of the 10th Planet system since 2007, I understand the importance of knowing this system. I am somewhat of an oddity because I am also a practitioner of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (gi) and Japanese Jujutsu. Internet forums often go off about “gi vs nogi” or “complex moves vs basics”. These arguments have nothing to do with the effectiveness of the 10th Planet Style.

I am not here to tell you which style of grappling is the best. None are. They all have merit and all practitioners can benefit from knowing something from the other. I know a lot of BJJ black belts that study Eddie Bravo’s approach to grappling and have incorporated his ‘moves’ into their study. Some do it in secret others are up front about it.

No one teacher has answers to everything. I remember hearing Professor Pedro Sauer (8th Degree Red and Black belt in Gracie Jiu Jitsu) once say “ You can learn a lot from a white, blue or purple belt. They will often come up with solutions you’ve never thought of.” I asked the Professor one day “What do you think of Eddie Sir?” He responded “He is a talented kid and actually has done a lot for jiu jitsu.” Pretty nice words from one of the world’s most respected and technical instructors.

Those who don’t understand the system will simply say “ its all about rubber guard and twister.” That’s like saying Sambo is only leg locks or Catch Wrestling is only about neck cranks and crushes. If you really look at 10th Planet Jiu Jitsu, it is a well thought out system of attacks and defenses from a variety of positions. It uses unusual positions (from the traditionalists point of view) to set up submissions. It is very offensive in its approachBeing flexible certainly helps to do some of the moves, but not all. But this goes for any art form. In time, you develop very good squeezing power and attacks from all positions. To be honest, one of the greatest gifts the 10th Planet system has and that Eddie has give the world, is his view of the half guard. He explored that position in crazy detail and came up with sweeps and attacks that traditionally weren’t there.

There are counter arguments to any point. I’ve heard everything from “rubber guard will hurt your knees” to “10th Planet moves will only confuse people” to “ that stuff will never work”. I’ve used it more times that I can count. I’ve seen people much better in jiu jitsu use it as well successfully while rolling and competing.

10th Planet Jiu Jitsu is not a stop gap measure. It isn’t the final solution. It isn’t the anti jiu jitsu. What it is-it’s a fantastic style of jiu jitsu that will teach you some amazing moves not found in traditional avenues. Add to your tool box and discover what it has to offer. That doesn’t mean leaving traditional BJJ behind. In fact, if you look at the new breed of Jiu Jitsu players now, they are just like Eddie. They are coming up with new positions and attacks that weren’t around 20 years ago. What Eddie did was set the ball in motion years before anyone else with his out of the box thinking. Now, it is common place.

In the end, it’s all Jiu Jitsu.

Ari Bolden Knazan

President of Submissions 101

STAY TUNED :.. Next 10th Planet article, Mission Control Plus+

Ari BoldenGuest author Ari (Bolden) Knazan is the founder and president of the most popular Jiu-Jitsu video channel on the planet, Submissions 101 (YouTube) and the owner of Fierce Studio in Victoria, British Columbia.  Starting his channel in 2007, Submissions 101 (as of Jan. 2012) #50 most viewed (all-time. Canada) and is nearing its 90,000th subscriber.  Ari is an amazing martial artist, teacher and friend.  He has also been a bouncer since 1995 and has written two books on the subject; Doorman’s Credo (2001) and Headlocks and Haymakers (2004). 

Click on his picture (above, left) to visit his website.

Roundtable Discussion 013 : Cage-Fighting Kids

Posted in Discussion Question, MMA, Roundtable Discussion with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 29, 2011 by Combative Corner

“What are your thoughts on the ‘Cage-Fighting Kids’ controversy?”

…Should kids be allowed to continue to “Cage Fight”?

We at the Combative Corner look forward to reading your comments! Please post them at the bottom of the article.

disagree: I don’t know if it’s my old age or what, but most of what I see is what is going on underneath; parents refusing to grow up.  When I was speaking to my friend about this the other day, we shared the exact thought:”Grown ups” these days are nowhere near the grown-ups of yester-years.  Everything that an adult may do in their free time doesn’t have to be shared by the child.  An adult for example my choose to drink, smoke, seek a sexual partner, or any number of things in dance clubs, bars and entertainment venues.  The location of these cage-fighting events are in such a place.  As for the activities that go in such places, you would not wish (at least I hope you wouldn’t) to expose a child to this environment and/or the goings-on that occur in said environment.

Nothing against mixed martial arts and/or cage fighting competitions, but leave it to those mature enough to understand for themselves what they are getting into.  Children will always want to emulate athletes or figures in popularized sports (such as MMA) but let’s make sure we are able to keep them safe (proper equipment, responsible refereeing), and expose them to an atmosphere that fosters (friendly) competition; not one that resembles a gladiator’s arena, or worse, prison.  If families want to cheer their children on, they can do so in various judo or jiu-jitsu dojos the world over, or in their own backyard under the watchful eye of their parent(s).

disagree: “Cage Fighting Kids” This is not a surprise to me, I knew it was going to head towards this. The kids follow adults. Kids will do what adults do. Just as it looks shameful for kids to fight in a cage, so too does it look shameful for adults to fight in a cage. It is a disgrace to Martial Arts, it’s a disgrace to the intelligence of human beings. Animals may fight in a cage, but human beings are supposed to be beyond the intelligence of animals.

As a society we are going backwards, not forwards in our progression in intelligence. Children are following in our footsteps and we are clearly setting a bad example. Don’t blame the children, blame the adults, blame the society, blame the people, & blame the government for not stepping in to do something about it. It is political, the government will be paid off to allow this type of organized violence, like alcohol & cigarettes, the government is banking off of cage fighting, & it does not look like it will stop.

Adults have become more violent & therefore children will become more violent. This is not a beautiful expression of Martial Art, it is a violent ugly expression. Children should be wrestling while smiling & giggling, they should be play fighting like what they do in WWE, all for fun, not out of real anger or violence. Anytime your aim is to hurt somebody, to put somebody else in pain out of anger, that is not Art, that is hate, it can be seen in all sorts of competitive fighting, not just in the cage.

disagree: What is my personal stance on these “Cage Fighting Kids”? People will do anything for money. I do not watch or care for cage matches as that is a sport. I understand that adults choose to fight in there and that is fine. But to out your Child in DANGER is more then a cause for this to be looked into deeply by Law enforcement. I do not call any of this Martial Arts. I call this a shame.

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agree: If it were a fight, then I would be upset that there was no protective equipment. However, it was not a fight. It was a grappling match. I really don’t understand the uproar or how it is dangerous or a bad idea.

I think our young boys and girls, especially in North America, have been “pussified” and are in need of this kind of physical activity. To compete, as grapplers, can be very beneficial to a child’s self-esteem and self-confidence. Grappling is fun and it can teach you a lot about yourself. It also requires a lot of discipline to get good at it.

There is no shame in what these kids did, and no shame in their parents allowing it. I personally think that it takes a certain amount of bravery to subject yourself to this kind of public scrutiny. And the kids…hell, there is no questioning their bravery.

There is also, on a spiritual note, a state of consciousness that is experienced in the ring that is ineffable. And unless a person has been in that position, he or she cannot understand it. Not to sound flaky, but if you’ve ever competed in a ring or a cage you know what I’m talking about. And this ineffable thing I am talking about was a critical experience in the evolution of my own consciousness.

With much deep respect to my colleagues here at the Combative Corner, I can see that I stray from the commonly shared value system in this regard. Although what I teach is not meant for sport, but for incapacitation or elimination of a threat, I would be honoured if any of my students decided to fight in a ring or a cage. I would support them 100% and I would be their #1 fan. And if I had a child, and he or she decided to train and compete like these kids did…I would be there every day to motivate, encourage, and build my child to be the best person he or she could be, and the best grappler he or she could be. And I would be the loudest cheerleader you’be ever heard.

somewhat disagree: I have objections to the “cage fighting” kids event, but not because the event was a serious danger to the kids. It was largely a grappling match, and even if there was striking, kids at that age are not really strong enough to seriously injure each other. The one potential safety issue is that the kids were not wearing head guards. A sprung ring floor (or possibly the support posts of the cage) can still cause a jarring impact to a child’s head. Kids may be resilient, but rattling the brain around can have serious developmental implications.

What is disturbing about the match was that it seemed staged for the spectacle. The event was not a kid-centric affair; it was ticket-holder only, and featured primarily real cage fighting with adults. The commentary from the announcers made it clear that the kids event was more about entertaining the audience than building character in the kids. Even though it was technically a grappling match, the kids event was in every other aspect like an actual cage fight. It makes you wonder if the event was a misguided glorification of combat sports or if the parents were vicariously living out their fantasies of fighting in the cage. The kids cage fight looks like a show for the amusement of the audience and for the profit of the sponsoring club.

somewhat disagree: While I agree that this was more of a grappling match than an actual MMA fight I still have issues with the way the two boys seem to be put on display for the people there to see the main event. It’s one thing to let a kid compete in a grappling tournament and to be cheered on by their parents, classmates and peers but it is another thing entirely to put them on display as part of an opening act to a main event.

The parents of the two boys competing in the “Cage Fight” are just like any other sports mom or dad that sees some talent in their child and instead of nurturing and encouraging it in a “normal” way go
overboard.  I personally don’t have a problem with the sport of Mixed Martial Arts and think that there are some very talented athletes that compete in the sport as well as some that give it a bad name which can be true of any sport.  I know the popularity of MMA is growing fast and with it the inevitability that children will become interested in it but I think that there are some things that should be just for adults.

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This article was written by the above authors/professional martial art instructors after viewing the following video

http://youtu.be/e4rTB0zhsNs

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