Archive for Combative Corner

CombativeCorner Turns 2 Years Old!

Posted in Miscellaneous, News with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2012 by Combative Corner

Joyce  |  This has truly been… and continues to be, a wonderful journey.  I want to thank all of our readers, our Combative Corner family for making these 2 years seem like 2 days.  The martial arts is a bottomless well, and with each fetching of water, I hope everyone continues to wet their lips.  The Combative Corner was founded on April 1st, 2010 and is one thing I deeply treasure, but not as much as the friends I’ve made.  A deep thank you to our Combative Crew: Vaughn, Kuo, Lara, Lee and Kennedy and a special thank you for each and every one of our “extended” family wherever you may be.  Cheers!  Oss, Michael Joyce (CombativeCorner.Com founderTwitter  |  Facebook

|  Lee  | My thoughts on the “Combative Corner” reminds me so much of the Martial Arts club I had founded in Purdue University from the years of 2000-2004 called “Fighters United.” The goal of the club was to bring together many talented Martial Artists in order to learn from one another. I see that Combative Corner aims to do the same in the online world. But great talent usually also comes with great ego. Without a Master, you have a bunch of students fighting amongst one another to prove who is right. When you gather a bunch of Masters together, now you may have a bunch of Masters fighting amongst one another to prove who is right. But a true Master does not fight; those that do fight are not Masters.

True Masters know the truth within & they do not need to express it with any words, they simply lead by example. Combative Corner aims to bring together Masters in order to share & learn from one another. YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia, & the internet in general bring people together on a large scale. Combative Corner creates a smaller close knit community so that there is a closer connection amongst those involved. YouTube is like a University, Combative Corner is like a Fraternity within the University. Yes you can make lifelong friends while attending a University, but if you join a group within the University that promotes a strong brotherhood, it will increase your chances of creating everlasting friends. Combative Corner aims to be the place where you immediately connect with true Masters of the Martial Arts, there is a regulator to control who is qualified & who is not. On YouTube & the internet in general, there is no regulator. Without a regulator, it will be very difficult for the novice to determine whether or not a Master is true or false.

|  Kennedy  |  The one thing I love about the CC above all else that I love about the CC is it`s lack of politics. Drama free….makes life so much easier. Kudos to MJ for running it that way. It makes me proud to be a part of it.

|  Kuo  |  Combative Corner has a unique feel. Michael has managed to get a diverse bunch of martial artists with different viewpoints together and express their thoughts in a civil manner. What has come out of this grand experiment is interesting posts and discussions covering a range of topics. All the while, things have not devolved into flame wars and name calling, which is all too common on the internet, especially when you get opinionated martial artists in the same forum.

As a group, we are not a mutual admiration society just restating the same opinion. We are also not a reality-show clash of personalities. The fact that different perspectives can get expressed without politics or personality clashes taking over is a tribute to both the contributors and to MJ for fostering a constructive environment at Combative Corner.

|  Vaughn  |  Anytime there is a chance for martial artists to come together and share their knowledge and experience with no bias towards style, age, years training or personal beliefs I think it is a great thing.
I was and still am honored to have asked to have been apart of it.
We are truly doing something great at the combative corner and I want to thank Michael for starting it all and bring us all together to not only share what we have learned with the masses but with each other as well. Let’s keep it going.
Happy Anniversary Combative Corner!

|  Lara  |  I feel this is a great honor to be able to share our arts with each other as well as view points. Without it we will never grow.  I have learned so much from my fellow Martial artist here as well. Thank you to each one of you for your fine posts! I look forward to many more years of growth here together at COMBATIVE CORNER.  Rei,  Robert Lara Shihan

Please let us know what you think of us in the comment space below!

What was your favorite article or interview perhaps? What do you hope to see more of in the future?

The lines are open.

Being Proficient In Combat : By: Sifu Lee

Posted in Philosophy with tags , , , , , , , , , , on August 11, 2010 by Sifu Freddie Lee

Ultimately Martial Arts should be for health preservation and spiritualism.  But it is my firm belief that a Marital Artist MUST be proficient in defending himself from a violent encounter.  And with that expectation, it requires very much physical training, technique training, cardio training, strength training, flexibility training, etc.  Basically a true Martial Artist should train like a competition fighter but do not compete.  It’s very easy for a weak inefficient Martial Artist to promote mental and spiritual development over physical development because they have the luxury of skipping a very important aspect that requires years of development.  To me, they are not complete.   In order to be complete and balanced a true Martial Artist must go through hard physical training, become extremely proficient in self defense, and then come to the realization that there is no need to fight.  As mostly all fights occur within the mind between the ego and the true inner spirit.

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We must realize the clear distinction between a Martial Artist and a Wise Sage.  For example Lao-Tzu, Buddha, J.Krishnamurti, and Osho are not Martial Artists, they are great spiritual sages.  Mentally and spiritually strong but physically weak.  Now someone like Bruce Lee, is a balanced Martial Artist.  As a disciple one must decide for oneself which path he wishes to partake in.  Does he wish to be a Wise Sage or does he wish to be a Martial Artist who has become a Wise Sage?  A disciple can skip over the physical if he wishes and come to the realization that physical combat training is no longer necessary, but if he does so, then he would no longer be a Martial Artist.  As specifically what sets the difference between a Martial Artist and a Wise Sage is that a Martial Artist has continued to realize the importance of self defense technique development and invests a balanced portion of his time to develop himself in that respect.

Sifu Freddie Lee

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Roundtable Discussion 002: Meditation

Posted in Roundtable Discussion with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 3, 2010 by Combative Corner

“How important is meditation in your discipline & personal practice?”

Lee:  Living a life of meditation is the highest state in the Martial Arts.  In “The Book of Secrets.” By Osho, there is 112 techniques of meditation.  Sitting meditation is just one of them.  When I first started practicing Martial Arts, I thought sitting meditation was the only meditation.  As I continued my study, I came to the understanding and realization that meditation can take place during ANY activity.  Meditation is a state of mind, of complete awareness, completely in the present moment.  Eckhart Tolle’s “The Power of Now” really helped me understand what meditation really is.  Once you disccover what meditation really is, your life will dynamically change, you will realize true happiness and bliss, there is no future, no past, no ego.  You are connected with everything around you, you are whole.  Meditation takes place throughout the entire day, sitting, standing, walking, cleaning the home, exercising, playing with kids, making love, reading, writing, speaking, etc.  Meditation is living life totally and completely aware.


Robert Lara: For me Aikido and Meditation go hand-and-hand.

Without a calm, centered mind we can never apply Aikido Waza in the proper way.

Only when we Meditate first can we hope to be able to fully have a relaxed mind, body & spirit. Meditation plays a very high role in my own training. I would never have made it to where I am today without it.

Joyce:  I’ve always considered myself an introspective person.  Even when I didn’t know specific forms or methods of meditation, I would find ways to bring myself to a place; a place as calming as a trickling brook.  As I became engulfed into the martial arts, and what I thought it meant to be a martial artist, my view of meditation became skewed.  I thought that, to be great, I had to sit or stand for long periods of time and somehow a great gift would be bestowed upon me.  There are sometimes, when I still think that.

My personal belief in meditation is that it’s the medicine to our soul.  Our form; what we practice with careful intention is our art.  The higher our souls happiness, the higher our form of art.  Meditation, the ability to find a tranquil spot within you, whatever the method is essential to health.

Vaughn:  I remember when I was taking Taekwondo back in middle and high school we used to meditate at the beginning and end of each class. We would kneel towards the front of the class and mediate, usually just for a minute or two. To to clear our minds of the chaos of the day so we could better focus on our training before class started and to relax after the workout and reflect on the techniques and drills that we had just gone over at the end. While the style I train in now doesn’t make mediation a regular part of the class routine I still do it in my personal life from time to time. Mainly as a way to help slow my mind down so that I can focus better on the things I have to accomplish or to to help calm myself when I get frustrated or agitated. Every now and then when I have a student that has trouble controlling their anger at school or at home I will show them how to use meditation and breathing, among other things, to help better keep their anger in check. I think meditation is a useful tool that people can gain a lot of value from, they just have to open their minds to it.

Davis:  The course structure for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) is sparring intensive (what we like to call “rolling”) and, as a result, every class one attends ought to be adrenaline/sweat packed or your not doing it right. It may appear to the outsider to be much more like a wrestling practice than a traditional martial arts class and the crazy, hyper-aggressive wrestler-types we all know and love are not, generally, associated with the Zen mentality. However, the assumption that meditation must be performed while sitting cross-legged and eyes closed attempting to tap into the flow of “the Ohm” is not only selling meditation short but misplacing the profits you made from the sale too. Meditation is the pursuit of a state of mind which allows the pursuant to not only understand but also become a unique part of the natural flow of the world around them. Us BJJ guys and gals may not know much about Zen meditation but if there are two things we know better than anyone its the importance of proper breathing (we are always trying to choke each other aren’t we?) and of the flow from one technique to another. It is often emphasized that you hit a move inside the transition period, an odd but important concept I cannot do justice to in writing here. In the novella Siddhartha, the main character the book is named after becomes the Buddha (or one with the Buddha depending on how you interpret it) only when he comes to understand the transient but inevitable nature of the universe. If you are to understand the meditation which comes with the practice of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu you must understand the martial art is just that: transient and inevitable.

Kuo:  I-Liq Chuan is a concept-based art which centers on the principles of Taiji (Tai Chi) and Zen. Mindfulness forms the basis of martial skill. As such, meditation is an important part of I-Liq Chuan training. Meditation is both a practice in itself, like sitting meditation or standing meditation; it is also inherent in regular solo and partner practice. The practitioner’s attention should always be present (mindful) in whatever is being practiced. Meditative practices expand the mind’s ability to perceive. At first, the perception of the self is emphasized to facilitate unification of the body with the mind. At this stage, the practitioner is developing kinesthetic sense, body awareness, and body control. Then, the attentions are expanded outward to the opponent and environment. When the mind can see the conditions of the moment as they are, it becomes possible to harmonize with the opponent and flow with the opponent’s force. True skill manifests when movements are based on perception of the true conditions rather than anticipations (or guesses) of what will happen.

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Please shot us your comments in the comment section below and let us know your answer to this very interesting question.

The Combative Corner Crew


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