Archive for the Techniques Category

The Ground Attack Posture from OutFoxxed

Posted in Self-Defense, Techniques, Training, Uncategorized, Women's Self-Defense with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 15, 2016 by chencenter

Since many of the attacks on women are of a sexual nature, we have to know how to fight back from different positions, including from our back!

The “G.A.P.”…

or Ground Attack Posture, is our favorite way of delivering a powerful attack and helping to create space for escape.  Take a look at this short and informative video that we made for you guys and gals!  If you have any questions, please comment on the video or visit our website (blog) for more details.  We have write-ups on each movement/technique we teach in order to improve your understanding.

And if you haven’t already, please subscribe, like and share.

[OutFoxxed Program on YouTube]

Brought to you by: Michael & Jennifer Joyce

Head instructors at the Outfoxxed Program

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The Fence – Fending off an Attack Before it Begins

Posted in Safety, Self-Defense, Techniques, Training, Violence, Women's Self-Defense with tags , , , , , , , , on November 10, 2015 by chencenter

[Read Entire Article]

If you’ve watched The 3 Main Postures video, you have some knowledge of what the Fence is and why we use it – but let’s go a little deeper, shall we?

The Fence, or versions of it, is as old as physical conflict itself.  But it wasn’t until the amazing teacher, author and martial artist Geoff Thompson (Coventry, UK) and his club really started to bring it into popularity as an effective way of managing the dynamics of physical altercations.  As a doorman (aka. bouncer), Geoff was able to learn quickly just how effective and important this technique can be.

WHAT IS THE FENCE?

The Fence is a temporary barrier we use to keep a potential attacker under control. All the Fence postures that we recommend start off with the body in a non-threatening position, with the purpose being – to lessen the aggression/intent of the person trying to harm you and to by you time to scan for help, plan an escape route, find an improvised weapon, and/or prepare to pre-emptively strike.   [READ MORE]

MICHAEL JOYCE

OUTFOXXED.COM

Low Kick Defense and Counters [Video]

Posted in Muay Thai, Techniques, Training with tags , , , , , , , , , , on August 21, 2015 by Combative Corner

Chris Clodfelter profile picI love getting the opportunity to do some videos for.Sean Fagan and Muay Thai Guy. Here is good one on evading leg kicks and firing right back. Dont forget to check out Nakmuaynation.com for even more solid muay thai info.

Chris Clodfelter, Eight Points Muay Thai

 

Push Hands: Learn to Fight, Not Push

Posted in Internal Arts, Martial Arts, Self-Defense, Teaching Topic, Techniques, Training with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 11, 2014 by Combative Corner

Eli Montaigue Mountains Push Hands

By Eli Montaigue of WTBA ©2014

Push Hands, is probably one of the most misunderstood training methods in Taiji.  Most schools of taiji teach push hands for the sake of doing push hands, to beat other people at push hands.
Taiji is about learning how to defend yourself in a fight. Pushing is not fighting.  No one is going to come up to you in the street and try to push you over. They are going to punch your face in, then kick you while you’re down.

I know people who have been training in push hands for many many years, and they are very good at “push hands”. If I play push hands with them, we are of equal skill etc.
However, I have been taught to hit from push hands. With these same people, when I start to put in any kind of strikes, they have no idea what to do. Because they have only trained in how to push. They might for example push me a little off balance, which makes me react with a strike. Followed by “you can’t do that, we’re doing push hands!” This only applies to a beginner doing push hands. Of course they must do it in a certain way, to learn certain principles. But if two advanced Taiji practitioners are doing push hands? You can do what you want. You can stand there and kick me in the groin, or head but me in the face. If I cannot stop you? My push hands is not good.

Eli Push Hands 1

picture 1

Ok, so how and why do we train push hands?

First up, stance!
Most schools of Taiji teach Push Hands from the same stance as they would use in the Taiji form. See picture #1.
This is a big mistake! The large stances in the form, are there for 3 main reasons. 1, to build heat in the legs to help the flow of Qi. 2, to strengthen the legs. 3, to stretch the legs. It is for health and exercise, and is in no way meant to be used for fighting.

The big stance in push hands teaches us many bad habits.  My father Erle Montaigue, use to teach big the stance to beginners, then he would advance them onto the small stance later on.
This is how he was taught.
However, after years of teaching, he found that the big stance, although easier to learn, was teaching the student nothing but bad habits. The big stance gives you a false sense of balance. What use is it to be able to hold your balance in a big stance, when you can’t fight from a big stance. In a small stance, you are more
mobile, you can protect your groin and knees, and you are
training yourself to be able to fight from the stance you’re already in when walking down the street.
The only way to deliver force from a small stance, without losing balance, is to use the same muscles as you would to strike. Via twisting of the waist, compression and release of the spine.
Thus training your body how to strike with power.

Eli Push Hands 2

picture 2

In a big low stance, you will be more likely to be training your body in the best way to push.

There are no pushes or pulls in Taiji, as they do not have a place in self defence. Unless your opponent is standing on a cliff edge!
{See picture #2}
It’s like if you were doing 500 squats every day and
hoping it would make you a faster runner.
You have to train the muscles for the work you want them to do. When we hold a big stance, this causes us to get into a forward backward weight change.
The pusher comes forward, the receiver evades by sitting back. See picture #1 again.
What’s the first thing you learn in self defence?
When someone attacks you, don’t sit back! You are
putting yourself in a vulnerable position. See picture #2.
In a small stance, when we shift the weight, this causes us to evade to the side, maintaining our forward intent. This now changes the intent of the pushing, from you attack and I defend, to you attack and I defend by attacking! In every attack there is defence, and in every defence there is attack. Basic Yin and Yang. See picture #3 and #4. Notice the closer proximity of the players, and that in Lu #4, it is applied with an intention of sitting to the side, rather then sitting back as in Pic #1.
This means you can maintain forward intent, and truly evade the attack. Sitting back does not get you out of the way of an attack. The closer lateral evasion also puts you in a
position to re attack.
The mind set is most important in Push Hands. Even if you are doing a pushing movement, you should have the body structure and intent of striking.

Eli Push Hands 3

picture 3

Eli Push Hands 4

picture 4

Hard or soft?
Ok here is where a lot of people get things wrong. Ever heard the quote “Steel wrapped in cotton?”.
This means we should seem soft on the outside. It does not mean we do things in a soft manor.
Anyone who tells you that you can defend yourself without using any substantial force, has clearly never been put under pressure.
What we do however is to structure the body so, that we have to use very little strength to get great effect. This is what P’eng training is all about. We learn this first in single Push Hands.

For example, when I do Push Hands with a beginner, but someone with much bigger muscles than me, their arms will get sore before mine. To them it seems like I have really strong arms, not that I am all soft and jelly like. But in fact my muscles are not stronger, it’s just that I am structuring my body so that I only have to deal with half the pressure.

The pressure of the incoming push, should start soft for the student to learn. Too much pressure in the
beginning can cause the student to use bad technique. But be sure to increase this to as much pressure as you can develop, as someone attacking you is not going to do so lightly!
From the receiving part, well you should use as much pressure as you need to. As you get more advanced, this amount will get less, as you will learn to move your centre around the force coming in.
Very soft training has it’s place, this teaches us to “listen” with our hand.
But to have this as your only practice? Well that would be like learning to kick without being able stand on one leg.

When I was learning push hands, if I did something wrong, lost my balance, or opened my guard etc,
I did not get pushed over. I got punched in the side of the head! Or kicked in the groin!
Two advanced Push Hands players should look like they are having a fight, not like they are dancing.

Eli Push Hands 5

picture 5

Ok now onto attacks.
In the beginning, for students learning the ground work for Push Hands, we do some “pushing” attacks. This teaches the beginner how the hold up a strong guard, stay grounded and move their centre out of the way of the
incoming force.
Then the power speed and aggression of the attacks are increased gradually, till they are full real attacks. Any type of attack can be put into push hands, from a practical cross punch, (see picture #5) to a silly back spinning kick to the head. It is most important not to see Push Hands as a competition!
It is a training method. Yes you try your best to hit the other guy, so you could say that you are trying to beat him. However, what you have to do in your push hands, is to use all types of attacks, not just the ones you’re best at. For example, if I was competing, I would only use the techniques that I knew were best for me. But this would not give my partner a very rounded training.

I would never throw a back spinning kick in a competition, because I know it is not my forte.
Same with grappling, I would not use this if I wanted to beat the other guy.
But I will use them in training, so that my partner gets to train against them. I still throw the attack as best I can, trying to catch my partner out. But knowing that due to the fact that I am throwing an easily defeated attack, I will most likely be the one to get hit. I have tested this one many people. They only train practical attacks, then they get hit by the silly attacks, because they are not use to them.

Eli Push Hands 6

picture 6

In defence though it is different. You see if you attack, you are not reacting, you have made a conscious choice to attack. But if you are defending, you are reacting to
something your partner is doing. And when you are training your subconscious to react, you want to train it in the most practical way that will be best for protecting yourself in the street.

Your first reaction in a situation should be to strike.

It is the quickest and most likely way to protect yourself. See picture #6. In my opinion, other methods such as arm/wrist locks, sleeper holds etc, should only be used when you know you have control of the situation. Perhaps there is a drunk guy in the pub, you have some mates there, you know there’s no real danger. So you would try to take care of the guy without doing too much damage.
But someone breaks into your home and catches you off guard, you have to protect your family. So your first reaction should be to strike. This is why we practice our locks and holds from the attacking part of push hands.

So to consolidate, if you have been training in push hands for anymore than a year, but don’t feel comfortable when someone is throwing punches at you, then your push hands has not done its job.
As I said at the top, what use is a training method that only makes you good at doing the training method.

Eli Push Hands 001

Eli is a guest writer for the CombativeCorner.  If you enjoyed this article, please check out the others that he’s done for us.

10 Questions with Eli Montaique

Standing Three Circle Qigong

Special thanks to Francesca Galea, Leigh Evans, and Lars-Erik Olsen, for appearing in the pictures

Proof read by Francesca Galea
Written by Eli Montaigue 04/12/2014

© Eli Montaigue 2014

____________________________________________________________________


eli montaigue profileEli Montaigue is a man of many talents.  He’s the chief instructor of the World Taiji Boxing Association, inherited from his late, legendary father-teacher Erle Montaigue and also the lead singer of the band Powder Monkeys.  Originally from NSW, Australia he currently resides in London, England.  Intent on spreading quality martial art teaching, he conducts many workshops throughout the year, locally and internationally.  For more information, visit the WTBA website at www.taijiworld.com

Watch and Learn Jiu-Jitsu – By: Ryron Gracie

Posted in Day's Lesson, Jiujitsu, Philosophy, Teaching Topic, Techniques, Training with tags , , , , , , , on December 3, 2013 by Combative Corner

Ryron Gracie - Gracie JiuJitsuA while back I was sparring with Rener and I remember being in danger of a choke. His attack was relentless. I tried every technique that I knew, but the choke kept getting deeper and deeper.  Seeing no other option, I abandoned the idea of pure technique and used everything I had to twist free from the choke. Let me be clear… I was more than close to losing the battle. What kept me from tapping or sleeping was not technique, but a strategic explosion.

Read the Original Article in Full! (HERE)

Q: Is it better to be technical and lose or explosive and survive?

Ryron’s Answer:

Its more efficient and a better investment of your time to be technical and lose. There is value in exploding out of bad situation to safety, it helps you understand what you are physically capable of.  Be aware of the risk of injury , worsening the position and most of all running away from learning the intricacies of jiu-jitsu.

Originally Posted on November 21, 2013 by

FightStoppers – Looking at the “One Strike Stop”

Posted in Discussion Question, Self-Defense, Techniques, Training, Videos with tags , , , , , , on February 6, 2013 by chencenter

Michael CC Pic

Let’s look objectively at the material & analyze the good, bad, & in-between.

Everyone, or I should say, anyone with a brain should know that in self-defense we are not looking to ‘win’ but to survive.  Our ego is the least of our worries.  In certain circumstances a pre-emptive strike is the only chance between escaping danger and being caught in ‘a fight.’

Paladin Press brings 6 self-defense professionals together to give us their “Go-To” technique.  You may click on the thumbnail to see the video.  Let us know what you think by commenting below.

fightstopper 2 lee morrisonLee Morrison – I’ve always enjoyed what Lee brings to the table & consider this to be the best of the 6 videos.  His “One-Stop” strike resembles a Wing Chun chain punch straight to the jaw –  making sure that it is quick & linear, non-telegraphed and with “enough juice to shake the brain.” I certainly can’t disagree with that!

fightstopper 1Mark Hatmaker – Mark’s video gave us a different feel to the confrontation.  Whereas Lee’s “One-Stop” focused on ending a fight, Mark’s emphasized more of a hit & run element using a back-hand (“eye-whip”) followed by a quick palm-heel combo.  He notes that in a true self-defense situation, use “anything around you as a weapon.”  And while this is certainly a valid, Bas Rutten-style scene escape – one would certainly hope that the attacker doesn’t run you down and make you pay for the preemptive assault.  If you choose to rely on this method, make sure the follow-up strikes do some damage.

fightstopper 5Wim Demeere – Demeere’s choice is a classic one-two combo in quick succession (lead hand-to-downward hooking punch).  While I like the distraction-punch combo, I don’t find that it works well for most people.  Ideally, it’s a shot to neck (or side of the head) that can render someone unconscious in a blink of an eye – on the other hand, most fights do not start with the attacker as a stationary target.  Also, it is harder, if not impossible, for a smaller guy to follow-up and (quite importantly) find his mark with his “fight-stopping shot.”  Lastly, you have to be very careful that your initial strike doesn’t back up or create too much movement in your opponent, thus reducing your chances to hit with the “fight-stopper.”

fightstopper 6Dan Shreiber – While many YouTubers have said that they disapprove of Dan’s headbutt and body-slam method, I think that it is an interesting and effective way of dispatching someone QUICK.  If you honestly ask yourself, “Where do men fight most often,” you’ll come to the answer that it’s usually at a club, bar, sporting event or somewhere where alcohol is served.  It’s usually loud and people have to get close or lean in to the other person to hear what the other is saying.  The only fault that I find with this technique is being able to accurately hit with the head and causing enough trauma that the fight ends there.  More than likely, you’ll have the advantage of being on top but the disadvantage is that you’ll likely be pulled into an exchange.

fightstopper 4Joseph Simonet – Simonet’s method of dealing with an attacker is simple, direct and I respect it highly.  In my opinion, Simonet is ‘spot-on’ when he says that the hands should be open in order “to be seen as the defensive dude.”  The technique is a one-shot-blast straight through your opponent [striking to the chin].  The image that springs to my mind is like a football “stiff arm” but given with massive speed, power and attitude.  He also goes to say that if caught on tape or viewed by others, the strike could be explained as something else [e.g. a quick shove] Brilliant!

fightstopper 3Bill Kipp – Kipp’s (of Fast Defense) method of stopping a fight with one blow was a bit “hit AND miss” for me.  His delivery system is a horizontal elbow direct to side of the face.  And although he says, “I wouldn’t use this as a preemptive strike, only if I wanted to take the guy out”… it automatically misses the point by drawing you into a fight whereby a punch exchange is almost certain to occur.  The other problem with this delivery (especially the way Bill Kipp does it) is that he steps in, telegraphing the elbow strike.  What I like about the technique is that the elbow IS utilized.  Elbows are strong, reliable, and deals a great deal of damage.  But while it certainly is a “Fight Stopper,” it isn’t deployed in the fashion that I find reliable.

Michael Joyce

Golden Thread Workshops

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Joe Rogan’s Sick Side Kick

Posted in External Arts, Karate, Tae Kwon Do, Techniques, Training, Videos with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 11, 2011 by Combative Corner

Joe Rogan is not your typical stand-up comedian, actor and commentator, he’s a martial artist with some pretty devastating moves.  This technique, which he has been perfecting since his early days in Tae Kwon Do, is soo amazing that UFC Champion George St. Pierre, wanted to video it so that he could re-watch and perfect for himself.  What do YOU guys think?

The lines are open…. (comment below).

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