Archive for the Fighters Category

The Education of Conor McGregor

Posted in Fighters, Mixed Martial Arts, MMA, Philosophy, ULTIMATE FIGHTING with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 16, 2015 by chencenter

Conor McGregor 2

In the mixed martial art world, people are still buzzing from Conor McGregor’s phenomenal 13-second victory over featherweight, undefeated champion Jose Aldo in UFC 194.  Some people may still be mumbling under their breath with distain, others may be scratching their head in confusion, but talent truly shines and at the moment, Irishman Conor McGregor is the beacon of mixed martial arts.  Currently he is 19-1-2, with his last defeat being 5 years ago/14 fights ago.

“…I see these shots, I see these sequences and I don’t shy away from them.. (if you do this) you are creating that Law of Attraction and it will become reality… I knew he’d (Jose Aldo) over-extend and I knew I’d catch him.”

But as crafty, confident and technical he is – there’s a higher level of skill that is being seen by all.  Easy to quote, easy to grasp (an understanding of), but hard to possess, is this melding of confidence, self-assuredness, courage, visualization, movement variation, and adaptability (to name a few).  So many people have put the mental aspect of fighting aside from “the game.”  The MMA world is full of fit and conditioned bodies, all striving to climb the ladder of success.  Few fighters strive to be different, try different things; some lack the courage or belief.  Perhaps with the growth of this 27-year old fighter from Dublin, the level of competition will reach an even greater height.

“If you can see it here (points to his brain) and you have the courage to speak it, it will happen.”

Bruce Lee said, “The way you think is the way you will become.”  He also said, more famously, “…Be (like) water.”  If you internalize what many of these teachers have said, believe it, and strive for perfection – success will come.  This is a lesson for all of us and something applicable to many factors in Life like; relationships, business and (in this case) sport & performance.

“Doubt is only removed by action.  If you’re not working, that’s when doubt comes in.”

Belief is not enough.  Anything that we require in life requires work.  But even when you’ve got belief and put in the work, how many of you continue to visualize failure? How many people continue to harbor the stressors that come with thinking “What if…”?

“…winners focus on winning. Winners focus on what they can control.  …Losers focus on winners.  People ask, did you learn anything (from Ronda, etc)… although I learned from watching the contest, the technical aspect of it… I already felt like the top before tonight.”

One thing that many people saw from the video that the UFC put out prior to the Dec. 12th event, was the huge amount of psychological warfare that Conor placed on Jose.  By watching the video (posted below), you can see the eagerness and tension building between the two combatants – but Conor, the aggressor, remains calm (if you want to call it that).  It’s the same taunting and prophesizing that helped give Muhammad Ali the legendary status he has today.  The only problem is you now have two fighters vying for the title “Greatest of all-time”  (Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor).  Floyd has a good argument as to why he should be (and we’ll explore that in another post), but with Conor, time will tell.  Even in an interview, LA Media Scrum (by MMAfigtingonSBN), Conor’s girlfriend wrote on his water bottle, “G.O.A.T.” Conor believes it, Conor’s girlfriend believes it, and in due time the world will as well.

But somehow it seems destined with Conor “Mystic Mac” predicting outcomes so precisely.  Here is what he said in UFC 194 : Exbedded on FOX (timestamp 3:10) –

“We’ll collide at that first exchange and that will be it.”

There have been many fighters to predict rounds, but how many have predicted one to the amount of exchanges?  It’s quite alright if you want to chalk it up to luck, that for someone who speaks so much will stumble on some truth – even a broken clock is right two times a day… but at some point, it goes to show you that mentally, if you open up and fully embrace this formula of success and are prepared to put in the hard work, the universe will manifest itself to you.

“Precision beats power, timing beats speed.”

When I heard this last quote,  I immediately thought of Bruce Lee.  Then I remember thinking, did this just come from a 27-year old fighter?  Because it sounded like it came from a physicist, or movement coach trying to boil things down to a simple understanding.  I was told that it came from Goethe.  Whoever said it first doesn’t matter.  The mark it makes does; and now it’s on the lips and minds of many.

conor-mcgregor-vs-hafthor-julius-bjornsson-of-game-of-thrones-fame-as-the-mountainBut the more I thought about this, the more I loved this quote because of its truth and relevance to the 13-second fight I just witnessed.  In Conor’s training we saw him playing body shots with The Mountain (aka. Gregor Clegane – real name, Hafthor Julius Bjornsson), from Game of Thrones (6’9, 400 lbs.), movement pattern work with Ido Portal and even snuffing out the flame of candles set about the room, with his punches (and kicks).

(Regarding the candles) Anyone who has ever tried this knows that it requires expert precision and tremendous quickness in order to pull this off.  In fighting, timing/rhythm will greatly disrupt, or stop an opponent’s effectiveness in attack or halt the opponent’s ability to start an attack.  If your timing is refined to the point that it enables you to move (and in this case, move and counter) at the very beginning of your opponent’s attack, the quickness of your attacker becomes of little concern.  It brings me back to Bruce Lee’s clip on Longstreet in which he says, “This time I intercepted your emotional tenseness.  From your brain to your fist, how much time was lost.” {CC article}

“When you face me, it’s a whole other ballgame.”

The message that Conor delivers in this statement, punctuates his determinedness, skill, undeniable confidence and flair – at the same time, alluding to the fact that those that face him are better fighters afterwards.  It depends on how you take it (losing).  But win or lose, there is something to learn, something to gain.  But what you should know is that when you fight Conor McGregor, you getting the whole Conor and you better not come to the fight with a singular approach – because that is just not going to work!

MICHAEL JOYCE

MENTIONED VIDEO

RELATED ARTICLE

CONOR McGREGOR’S #1 TRAIT

BRUCE LEE: ‘THE ART OF DYING” {PLUS VIDEO}

CONOR McGREGOR vs. THE MOUNTAIN

Becoming a Duellist

Posted in Fencing, Fighters, History, Martial Arts, Swordsmanship, Weapons with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 12, 2015 by chencenter

Duel Basil Rathbone Zorro

In his book, famous fencing master Aldo Nadi realistically describes the tension, obstacles and high-stake nature of the duel – one that he experienced first-hand in1924. Only 24 years old, but an undefeated champion in 3 weapons, Aldo remained confident and eager to prove himself against a live point.  Aldo squared off against Adolfo Cotronei, an Italian newspaper editor, over a story Contronei printed saying that Italian champion Candido Sassone beat French champion Lucien Gaudin 9-to-7.  Honor at stake, they met a secluded place   [read more at “The Duel”]

Aldo Nadi DuelHe writes:

In competition, the good fencer leisurely watches his opponent for a few seconds before starting the slightest motion. Here you are by no means allowed to do so because your adversary immediately puts into execution a plan evidently well thought out in advance: surprise the youngster at the very beginning; take advantage of his lack of dueling and bear upon his nerves and morale.”

THE NATURE OF THE DUEL

The Duellist movie Duel 2No film has picked up on the atmosphere and realism of the duel quite like Ridley Scott’s 1977 epic film, The Duellists. Choreographed by the famous William Hobbs (Excaliber, Willow, & The Count of Monte Cristo) it remains one of the best examples of sword-fighting – especially in this period, (Napoleonic era).

What you notice right away by viewing these fight scenes, is that the intention and awareness is focused on his opponent (remember, your life is on the line). Two, each fighter is hesitant on making a non-calculated action until there is a need to react to something – something that you possibly did not expect. And third, the fight scene is extremely short. Many duels started and finished in the time it took to read this paragraph.* Cutting with a sabre often produced gaping wounds, but it was the thrust (often w/ dueling sword, smallsword or rapier) that was fatal.

*Keep in mind that once the actual sword-fighting starts, depending on the skill, fighting area, luck, etc., duels could last anywhere from seconds to several minutes.  Most duels didn’t last more than 10 minutes.  But think of the amount of stamina that that would require! Needless-to-say, if you are serious about sword-fighting, be ready for anything.  

TECHNIQUES FOR DUELING

epee5It is of my opinion that if you can’t fight well against one person, you can’t and won’t perform well in a skirmish/battle. It is very important that you first learn your weapon (or weapon set) & build your skill. This includes Guard positions, techniques and movement tactics (learning first solo, then one-on-one and then (perhaps) multiple opponents).

>Bruce Lee once said, “One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs in simplicity.” This quote can easily be understood by the experienced martial artist – but is often hard for the beginner. Learn your techniques, various ways of movements…be a scientist of the martial sciences and put your skill and techniques to the test in competition.

What techniques serve you the best?

Which ones keep you safe or make you harder to hit/counter? Keep them.

Discard those techniques that put you in a bad position, are too flashy or complicated.

Find your personal “Go-To” techniques.

MINDSET

The mindset, especially in training and mock-dueling is essential. It must be centered around one thing – never allow a single touch. And if a touch is received, never allow a second. Always make it hard for your opponent to attack, find steady footing, or catch a breath. Use your environment, training and your intelligence in sword-fighting to be victorious. Victory favors the skillful!

FIGHTING FAIR

I tell my young students, “Imagine you stepped back in time… You encounter a villainous foe, and he corners you into a fight; a fight to the death!” In an act of self-preservation you grab firmly your weapon of choice and ready yourself for any oncoming attack.  In all matters of self-defense, I think it is fair to say “Anything goes.” This may include acquiring another weapon, kicking sand, or dirtying your point (in hopes that the doctor or director halts the bout, thus giving you a needed breather).  However, under normal circumstances and in hopes of winning honorably… I find it best to train using solid (go-to) techniques and spar using great sportsmanship.  Ultimately, if one had the liberty of choice (in dying), most would choose the honorable over the cowardly.  At least one would hope.

MICHAEL JOYCE

WSFENCING.INFO

I know there are many fencers and historians out there that might have some a different idea or opinion towards duels and/or what I have written.  If you would like to offer any comments, critiques, or possible revisions/errors, please let me know by leaving a comment and I will review and take them under heavy consideration.  Thank you!

Luke Holloway. Here’s What I Really Think

Posted in Fighters, Martial Arts, Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , on August 14, 2013 by hybridfightingmethod

holloway profileA lot of people are interested in Luke Holloway these days?

As much as his royal manhawk is conquering the world right now on and off the internet, I see no legitimate reasons, from my perspective, to try and discredit him or otherwise publicize what negative things I feel about his character.

That being said,…

Here is what I really feel and think about Luke Holloway.

But who the fuck am I and what the fuck do I know about Luke?  I have had the pleasure of meeting Luke his first time to Canada. I picked him up at the airport in a borrowed car to accommodate for that man’s mammoth frame and cranium. He’s a big man, at 6’4″ and somewhere around 250-260 lbs.  Seeing him walk out of the terminal with his earbuds in and constant surveying gaze (he has cat-like awareness of the surroundings), our eyes met, smiles ensued, and we never stopped laughing since that moment years ago.

I will get to professional opinions in a moment, but my personal feelings about Luke are important to note, as well.

10 QUESTIONS WITH LUKE HOLLOWAY

luke and tj 2I think he is a wonderful human being.  I think he is funny and I think he’s energetic, charismatic and fun to be around.  He is also super smart.  That’s why I hang out with him and why we get along so well. I find his worldview refreshingly flexible and his mind open.  He has become as close as a brother and if everyone treated others the way he treated me there would be a whole lot more respect and peace in the world (not the least of which is the martial arts world).

Professionally, he was in the industry for some years before me and so serves as a blueprint for success to me.  Many people try and tell me how to run and market my international combatives company.  Luke is one of the few who are fully qualified to actually do so, and yet, he doesn’t unless asked.  He is a humble individual who’s level of respect for people is perfectly at home in Japan, where he spent many years.

Kennedy & Holloway Video

Kennedy & Holloway Video

Training with him, I find that he is open to learn and open to teach. a great partner to exchange ideas with. his mind is sharp and able to multitask well. the ability for complex and original thought means more to me, personally, than credentials, but Luke has some goddamn credentials. I remember being with my country’s national police heads (RCMP) in London, England watching the riot police (public order) train in 2012. I have many memories, some tangible, that will never be publicly seen or talked about. I’ve seen some of Luke’s, and he trains some serious dudes (and dudettes, too).

LUKE RETURNS TO TORONTO – AUG 31st & SEPT 1st

I can appreciate Luke’s system, also because I am a student of movement. I love studying movement.  With the southeast Asian kinetic contribution to RAW Combat, mixed with kinetic influence from tai chi, it is a system that really teaches you how to use your body as a weapon.  That is the same goal of the Hybrid Fighting Method that I teach – and that’s why I can confidently endorse his system to my students and instructors to broaden their knowledge.

holloway gunAlso keep in mind that he is the alpha (leader) of his organization (and an alpha in his day-to-day) and it’s in our evolutionary makeup as men to challenge the alpha for status within our social hierarchies.  This happens all the time, and Luke takes it with grace.

Outside of evolutionary psychology with respect to group dynamics, complaints he has received from within his organization can, in my opinion, be chalked up to personality differences and other personal schisms.  Something you must keep in mind with Luke is that he is still a young buck.  What I mean is he is a young guy full of testosterone and he likes to let loose.  This exciting, take-no-prisoners attitude often gets misunderstood as egotism.  If Luke does have an ego larger than his own head…..which, by the way, have you seen his fucking head?!..  I haven’t noticed. I have been surprised before by guys I called ‘brother’ who ended up being total dicks.  I haven’t yet witnessed that with Luke.

My experience has been nothing but positive.

All in all, Luke is a great guy, great martial artist, and a great instructor… and one helluva dancer!

T.J. KENNEDY
HYBRID FIGHTING METHOD
LUKE HOLLOWAY WORKSHOP (TORONTO) – AUG 31st & SEPT 1st.
Contact T.J. Kennedy via Facebook or website
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The Evolution of Metamoris

Posted in Discussion Question, Fighters, Jiujitsu, News, REVIEWS with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 13, 2013 by Combative Corner

Metamoris-II-Gracie-vs-AokiJune 9th

Metamoris II, wrapped up over the weekend and although an amazing and prestigious venue with incredibly talented athletes, many viewers (and certainly many tournament-goers) were left in a state of melancholy.  While I believe most people felt this, I believe that even those people that held the greatest of sadness still feel the same;

The no points, “submission-or-decision” version is a platform to showcase jiu-jitsu skill at the highest level – and we are all glad to have the opportunity to experience it.

Does the ‘Bad’ Overshadow the ‘Good’?

There were some great jiu-jitsu matches: Rafeal Lovato Jr vs. Andre Galvao, Brualio Estima vs. Rodolfo Vieira, and Kron Gracie vs. Shinya Aoki (despite a prolonged “feeling out” process in the beginning).  Things took a turn for the worst in the highly-talked-about match between Roberto “Cyborg” Abreu and Brendan Schaub (video).

Schaub vs. Abreu Metamoris 2Abeu, who did just about everything he could to engage in the fight, was highly disappointed afterwards (despite winning by decision).  Athletes come to an event like this to both test and showcase their skill in grappling.  Abreu wasn’t truly given the opportunity, and Schaub’s “nullification” of Abreu’s jiu-jitsu was borderline disrespectful and his strategy, confusing.

The Will To Survive

Ralek Gracie said, “I founded Metamoris to create a tournament where submissions are the only goal, not points.  With the introduction of judges, we will avoid judges… Someone in a fight is always sharper (link).”

As a student of Gracie Jiujitsu (Joyce) and who has had the opportunity to speak and train with both Ryron & Rener Gracie (Schaub’s jiujitsu trainers), I can say I understand what the Gracie system is all about.  Obviously Gracie Jiujitsu works and is a highly-refined martial art, however when you put a brown belt (Schaub) up against a 12-time Grappler’s quest, 3-time World Nogi Champion (and many more accolades) back belt (Abreu), you can only hope for one thing in my opinion, to survive.

In addition, the thought somewhere in Schaub’s brain, were UFC President Dana White’s one condition for taking this contest, “Don’t get hurt.”  Fortunately or unfortunately for Schaub, it was just his reputation that got hurt.

What Needs To Be Done

The only problem that I see in the Metamoris Tournament is in casting.  I believe that the matches should only be performed by players of black belt level or higher.  Furthermore, the black belt must be in a grappling-based system of martial art.  Metamoris does not need to be in the game to bring in “big names” (such as those in the UFC).  Audiences around the world wish to be riveted by high-level, submission-only grappling and while some competitors can be found in the UFC, Pride, etc, the focus should remain on those whose grappling game holds a high degree of depth and intelligence.

In that light, I am very pleased of the announcement of:

Royler Gracie vs. Eddie Bravo for Metamoris III

Eddie Bravo: “..they want to find out if I got lucky that time.” (Full 1st Fight video)

Royler Gracie: “He got lucky.”

Combative Corner: “We shall see won’t we? Either way, it should be a best outta 3, don’tcha think?”

MICHAEL JOYCE

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Cus D’Amato on Fear

Posted in Boxing, External Arts, Fighters, Miscellaneous, Teaching Topic with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 13, 2012 by Combative Corner

Cus D'Amato. Portrait

Cus D’Amato [1908-1985] was a man of great integrity, knowledge and heart.  Most famous as being the manager and trainer of champions Floyd Patterson and Mike Tyson, many martial artists outside of boxing would come to learn about him through his brilliant insights on fear and the psychology of fighting.

“Boxing is a sport of self-control. You must understand Fear so you can manipulate it. Fear is like fire. You can make it work for you: it can warm you in the winter, cook your food when you’re hungry, give you light when you are in the dark, and produce energy. Let it go out of control and it can hurt you, even kill you….Fear is a friend of exceptional people.” [Fire 50]

On Recognizing Fear

“Fear is the greatest obstacle to learning in any area, but particularly in boxing. For example, boxing is something you learn through repetition. You do it over and over and suddenly you’ve got it. …However, in the course of trying to learn, if you get hit and get hurt, this makes you cautious, and when you’re cautious you can’t repeat it, and when you can’t repeat it, it’s going to delay the learning process…When they…come up to the gym and say I want to be a fighter, the first thing I’d do was talk to them about fear…I would always use…the same example of the deer crossing an open field and upon approaching the clearing suddenly instinct tells him danger is there, and nature begins the survival process, which involves the body releasing adrenalin into the bloodstream, causing the heart to beat faster and enabling the deer to perform extraordinarily feats of agility and strength…It enables the deer to get out of range of the danger, helps him escape to the safety of the forest across the clearing…an example in which fear is your friend.
The thing a kid in the street fears the most is to be called yellow or chicken, and sometimes a kid will do the most stupid, wild, crazy things just to hide how scared he is. I often tell them that while fear is such an obnoxious thing, an embarrassing thing…nevertheless it is your friend, because anytime anyone saves your life perhaps a dozen times a day, no matter what how obnoxious he is, you’ve got to look upon him as a friend, and this is what fear is…Since nature gave us fear in order to help us survive, we cannot look upon it as an enemy. Just think how many times a day a person would die if he had no fear. He’d walk in front of cars, he’d die a dozen times a day. Fear is a protective mechanism….By talking to the fighters about fear I cut the learning time maybe as much as half, sometimes more, depending on the individual.” [Heller, 60]

The Next Thing…

“The next thing I do, I get them in excellent condition….Knowing how the mind is and the tricks it plays on a person and how an individual will always look to avoid a confrontation with something that is intimidating, I remove all possible excuses they’re going to have before they get in there. By getting them in excellent condition, they can’t say when they get tired that they’re not in shape. When they’re in excellent shape I put them into the ring to box for the first time, usually with an experience fighter who won’t take advantage of them. When the novice throws punches and nothing happens, and his opponent keeps coming at him…the new fighter becomes panicky. When he gets panicky he wants to quit, but he can’t quit because his whole psychology from the time he’s first been in the streets is to condemn a person who’s yellow. So what does he do? He gets tired. This is what happens to fighters in the ring. They get tired. This is what happens to fighters in the ring. They get tired, because they’re getting afraid….Now that he gets tired, people can’t call him yellow. He’s just too “tired” to go on. But let that same fighter strike back wildly with a visible effect on the opponent and suddenly that tired, exhausted guy becomes a tiger….It’s a psychological fatigue, that’s all it is. But people in boxing don’t understand that.” …[Heller, 61]

“… However, I should add that at no time does fear disappear. It’s just as bad in the hundredth fight as it was in the first, except by the time he reaches a hundred fights or long before that he’s developed enough discipline where he can learn to live with it, which is the object, to learn to live with it…”

“Every fighter that ever lived had fear. A boy comes to me and tells me that he’s not afraid, if I believed him I’d say he’s a liar or there’s something wrong with him. I’d send him to a doctor to find out what the hell’s the matter with him, because this is not a normal reaction. The fighter that’s gone into the ring and hasn’t experienced fear is either a liar or a psychopath…” [Heller, 67]

The Hero and the Coward
“I tell my kids, what is the difference between a hero and a coward? What is the difference between being yellow and being brave? No difference. Only what you do. They both feel the same. They both fear dying and getting hurt. The man who is yellow refuses to face up to what he’s got to face. The hero is more disciplined and he fights those feelings off and he does what he has to do. But they both feel the same, the hero and the coward. People who watch you judge you on what you do, not how you feel.” [Heller, 97]

10 Questions with Megumi “Mega Megu” Fujii

Posted in 10 Questions, Fighters, Mixed Martial Arts, MMA, ULTIMATE FIGHTING, Videos with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 29, 2012 by Combative Corner

Megumi “Mega Megu” Fujii is one of the best pound-for-pound female mixed martial artist in the world.  Currently at 25 wins – 1 loss* (Sherdog). We had the unique privilege to talk to her and get the latest.  Due to the brevity of Twitter and the fact that we cannot read Japanese (without the help of Google Translator), this interview is fairly brief.  Answers were able to be expanded due to the great work of the guys at The Grappling Dummy and director Matt Benyon. Watch video at the bottom of the article to view.

To visit Megumi’s official website (in Japanese), click image above.

1, How did you begin the martial arts & fighting competitions?

On the recommendation of my father (a strong Judo practitioner), I began studying judo at the age of three and continued up until about 22 years of age.  Did Sambo, Jiu-Jitsu, Wrestling/Grappling starting at 23.  I was 30 years old when I started in Mixed Martial Arts.  I wanted new and challenging things.

I wondered what I could do to take advantage of my experience, so I decided on MMA.

I’m motivated to do things other people have never done.  When everyone else will give up.  I am different.  I won’t.

2, How do you spend your day

Always weight & MMA training.  I never get bored with this.  I feel uncomfortable when I am not training!  And there’s no secret.  You have to train hard to win.

3, What exercises do you enjoy training with the most?

Push ups!

4, Who are some of your favorite athletes/influences?

Josh Barnett, Fedor Emelianenko and Frank Edgar

5, What do you like to do in your free time?

I like to watch movies, go to dinner with friends and play with cats. (=^^=)

6, What goes through your mind or what do you think about before your fight?

Before the fight, comes a feeling of fear…and fun.  Nearing the fight, I try to soothe my mind – Nothing in the mind.  Once the fight starts I think about my strategy.  And I move!

7, More of your fights are going to the decision – Has this been a result of a strategy change?

I like to finish the fights and have the audience rejoice.  My last big fight (Zoila Gurgel) I wanted to win badly, but lost (to the decision).  In the future, fight to the finish!

8, What is your favorite “finishing move” to use in a fight?

My favorite techniques are the ankle-lock and the arm-bar.

9, At the age of 37, how much longer would you like to compete? Afterwards, what do you want to do?

I will be 38 in May.  This year I am going to continue to work hard and fight.  Next year… that I do not yet know.

10, Your perfect undefeated record ended with Ziola Gurgel.  How did you feel about how that fight went?  What did you wish you did differently?

Zoila is a great fighter.  I thought I really won that fight, but lost instead.  I wanted to ask the referee, “How can this be?”  To lose a “perfect record” is very disappointing.  Since the match was in the United States, I did have some jet lag and fatigue.  But I’m eager for a rematch.  Hopefully I’ll be back in the United States soon!

Bonus,

What is your favorite cartoon?

Sponge Bob ! ! !

We at the Combative Corner, Thank Megumi for her time and consideration and wish her the very best. 

我々は Combative Corner で彼女の時間と配慮のためにめぐみに感謝し、彼女の非常に最善を尽くしたいと思います。

VIDEO INTERVIEW [ENGLISH SUBTITLES]

*Responses in italics expanded from GrapplingDummy’s interview-  Sept. 2010

*Megumi Fujii stats are from Sherdog.Com

Ronda Rousey – New StrikeForce Champion

Posted in Fighters, Judo, Mixed Martial Arts, MMA, News, Videos with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 5, 2012 by Combative Corner

Fans had something to cheer about Saturday night, March 3rd, 2012 as the quick upstart, Ronda “Rowdy” Rousey defeated Miesha “Takedown” Tate to become the new women’s bantamweight champion.  An Olympic bronze medalist in Judo, Rousey began her pro MMA start only a year ago and now holds the belt from 5-year veteran Tate.  Noted for her solid armbars, many of Rousey’s fans knew that it would just be a matter of time before Tate would get caught.

Tate came out swinging but eventually fell to “The Armbar” at 4:27 of the first round.  The extent of the elbow hyper-extension is still playing on the people’s minds but as Tate said, “…I came here to fight.”

About Tate, Rousey had this to say:

“She was much more savvy on the ground than I had anticipated… She’s good, she’s legit, but I don’t feel that bad about the armbar finish.”

Ronda Rousey, if she hasn’t already, has (in many’s eyes – and almost “overnight”) become “The Face” of Women’s Mixed Martial Arts.  She will deny it and say that Gina Carano still holds that mantle – but the wicked truth is that “Rowdy” is here to stay and is truly making her mark… and in remarkable fashion.

Watch the Gracie Breakdown for a breakdown like only the Gracie Brothers can give.

Pro Records of : Ronda Rousey and Miesha Tate at Sherdog.Com

THE “HEATED” WEIGH-IN : VIDEO

STRIKEFORCE HIGHLIGHTS  :  RECAP

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