Archive for the Day’s Lesson Category

Johnny Karate Theme Lyrics

Posted in Day's Lesson, Karate, Martial Arts, Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 4, 2017 by Combative Corner

parks-and-rec-johnnykarate

The Johnny Karate Super Awesome Musical Explosion Show is a fictional show in which Andy Dwyer (Chris Pratt) uses his talents of being a kid to the ultimate.  The J.K.S.A.M.E.S appeared in Season 7-Episode 10 of the NBC television show Parks and Recreation and had a very well-crafted farewell theme song that is worth sharing… for those that wanted a reminder and for those that never saw the show.  Enjoy!

Well it’s time for us to go,

But I want you all to know

That Karate’s not about fighting

It’s about knowing who you are,

And being kind and honest

While you’re kicking for the stars.

Yeah, that’s the Johnny Karate way.

(second part)

Keep Karate in your heart

And aspire to your dreams,

And always remember

You’re forever on my team.

Yeah, that’s the Johnny Karate Way.

Karate Yell!

….Hi ya!!!!!

The J.K.S.A.M.E.S also had wonderful, kid-friendly objectives for each show (pictured below).  Don’t we all wish we grew up with a fun show like this?  If you’d like to view the episode, you can find it on dvd, Netflix and Amazon.

The fifth Karate move to success is “To do something nice for someone.” FYI.

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Parks and Recreation

Season 7, Episode 10 

Pictures and lyrics courtesy of NBC and Open 4 Business LLC.

Watch and Learn Jiu-Jitsu – By: Ryron Gracie

Posted in Day's Lesson, Jiujitsu, Philosophy, Teaching Topic, Techniques, Training with tags , , , , , , , on December 3, 2013 by Combative Corner

Ryron Gracie - Gracie JiuJitsuA while back I was sparring with Rener and I remember being in danger of a choke. His attack was relentless. I tried every technique that I knew, but the choke kept getting deeper and deeper.  Seeing no other option, I abandoned the idea of pure technique and used everything I had to twist free from the choke. Let me be clear… I was more than close to losing the battle. What kept me from tapping or sleeping was not technique, but a strategic explosion.

Read the Original Article in Full! (HERE)

Q: Is it better to be technical and lose or explosive and survive?

Ryron’s Answer:

Its more efficient and a better investment of your time to be technical and lose. There is value in exploding out of bad situation to safety, it helps you understand what you are physically capable of.  Be aware of the risk of injury , worsening the position and most of all running away from learning the intricacies of jiu-jitsu.

Originally Posted on November 21, 2013 by

Sifu Lee on Children & the Martial Arts

Posted in Day's Lesson, Martial Arts, Miscellaneous, Peace & Wellbeing, Teaching Topic, Training with tags , , , , , , , on August 8, 2013 by Sifu Freddie Lee

Children Kids Class Education KindergartenI cannot force my children to practice Martial Arts.

That is against the Tao. 

If it comes natural, let it be, if it does not, let it be.  My children will have to exercise, practice good hygiene, eat healthy, and sleep well.  Those are necessities that they have no choice in fulfilling.  We live the healthy way, so my children have no other choice but to follow.  The fridge is only filled with healthy foods, there is nothing else to eat.  It is either eat healthy or starve.

They are forced to brush their teeth and take showers even when they don’t want to, it is a necessity of health and wellness.  The lights go out at a certain time so they have no other choice but to sleep when it is time.  They exercise because there simply is nothing else to do.  We have no cable TV to watch.  We have movies, but movies get old.  They play online games, but eventually they have to stop and move around.  They want to go to the park to play, when they go to the park, that is the beginning of their physical training.  Even at home they are very active running and playfully wrestling.

Activeness is extremely important.  The must be active.  But as far as formal exercise training, like in the beginning stages of Martial Art training, I do not force but I encourage.  They know they will make us happy when they participate, knowing this encourages them to get involved.  I also notice that when other children are around taking the training serious, they tend to get more involved.

Freddie Lee pinterestBrandon loves playing XBox 360.  We have an agreement that if he practices Kung Fu for 1 hour, he can play Xbox, and this agreement is working wonders.  It really motivates him to get involved with the training.  Angelina naturally loves to train and does not need video games as a motivation.  Brandon and Angelina enjoy spending time with me and that is what makes them want to participate.

The kwoon is also separated from our home.  Taking them to the kwoon creates a separate environment that also motivates them.  Staying at home all day makes a child want to get out and be somewhere new.  The kwoon becomes a quick getaway to do something exciting and different, this helps a great deal.  Keo does get involved as well, but he is not as motivated as Brandon and Angelina because he is still a bit young and does not have as much energy as Brandon and Angelina.  Jet is the only one that is unable to participate in anyway because of his extreme lack of focus and attention span.

I see that it is very important not to force the children to learn Martial Arts; they will learn when they are ready.  If they experience great struggle in life, it may encourage them to learn when they wonder why they are having such a difficult time overcoming these struggles.  Sometimes it will take a child getting bullied or beat up in school in order for him to realize that he needs to take action and get started in something like Martial Arts to defend himself when necessary.

It is of absolute necessity that children learn to be healthy and nonviolent.  If they are able to live a peaceful life, they may never find a need to learn Martial Arts at all.  But if they are surrounded by struggle and conflict, Martial Art training may very well end up becoming a necessity.  It depends on each child’s circumstances.  It is not right for a parent to force a child to practice an Art that he/she does not enjoy.

If he would rather play the drums or read, let him do so.  But no matter what he chooses, he must find time to exercise.  Exercise is something that I will always enforce, because him refusing to do so is no other reason than just pure laziness.  When a child is being lazy, you must teach him the way to combat this laziness and become active.  When a child is continuously active, Martial Art training will come on its own natural way that is unforced.

Sincerely,

Sifu Freddie Lee

Freddie’s Modern Kungfu. Chicago, IL.

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A Story From The Corner

Posted in Day's Lesson, Miscellaneous, Safety, Self-Defense with tags , , , , , , , on January 31, 2013 by hybridfightingmethod

Subway Car

I want to share this story from one of my students. I am not releasing her identity.

She was riding the subway (the tube) and she fell asleep. She was woken up by the slam of the inter-car door while the train was in motion.

Three large men whisked through and walked to the end of the car and stood huddled.

Her intuition fired like crazy, and she got off at the very next stop, long before her home.

I am very proud of her.  And I want use her example as a lesson to follow your intuition.

Maybe nothing was wrong, but either way she is alive to tell the story.

As Rory Miller says in his book Meditations on Violence,

“It is better to avoid than to run; better to run than to de-escalate; better to de-escalate than to fight; better to fight than to die.”

This woman showed the best self-defense possible as far as I’m concerned!

T.J. Kennedy

Hybrid Fighting Method

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Kuo on “What is Martial Art” : RTD 018

Posted in Day's Lesson, Discussion Question, Martial Arts, Philosophy with tags , , , , , on January 16, 2013 by mindbodykungfu

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“Art” is one of those hard-to-define words which means different things to different people. Most people tend to think of the fine arts (painting, sculpture, dance, theater, etc) when “art” is brought up in conversation. In my opinion, art encompasses any endeavor which requires skill and is an expression of the artist. Both the fine arts and the martial arts require refined skills and are a creative expression of the artists.

Human nature has violent and physical aspects, so it only natural that there are art forms set in the context of fighting. What separates the martial “art” from mindless brawling is the systematization of the fighting such that the movements and principles of fighting can be trained without violence necessarily being the end goal. When such a systematization is present, the martial artists can train the craft of fighting and express the principles of a martial arts style in their movements. Watching martial artists who have mastered their craft is similar to watching the skillful movements of a dancer or an athlete competing at peak performance. By blending with an opponent’s attacks and weaving offense and defense, the martial artist is demonstrating a beautiful display of body movement and force interplay.

The practice of martial arts is a physical expression of the practitioner’s self. You can perceive actors performing with feeling, athletes competing with heart, and painters creating with vision. You can also tell the difference between martial practitioners moving with rote, reflexive patterns and the skillful artists moving with intent and dynamically adapting to their opponents. With skilled martial artists, the hours of deliberate practice shine through with efficient movements, powerful attacks, solid defense, clear perception of an opponent’s attacks, and an exquisite sense of timing and distance. The martial artist elevates fighting to a skilled craft.

Coming from a primarily Chinese martial arts background, I also believe another defining characteristic of martial arts is that they are a path to self-improvement. At the most basic level, martial arts training develops focus, discipline, physical conditioning, and camaraderie. However, the self-improvement to which I am referring is the (perhaps cliched) life-altering, fundamental truth-realizing types of change. To pursue a martial art to a high level–or any serious endeavor for that matter–one has to devote a lot of time and effort. That in and of itself cuts off a lot of other life possibilities since time and energy and unfortunately limited resources. While on the path to mastery, martial artists must ask themselves if the art is something they truly wish to pursue and what sacrifices they are willing to make to achieve their goal. They must determine who they are, who they want to be, and what they want out of life before they can commit to pursuing mastery of an art.

To reach high levels of proficiency with a martial art, the practitioner’s mental acuity must be elevated. Even in high level athletics, physical training is rarely the limiting factor; rather it is the mental game that defines the elite. The martial artist’s mind must be trained to maintain focus, develop a keen kinesthetic feel, and perceive the conditions in a fight. Martial artists must develop mental fortitude to deal with the inevitable roadblocks and setbacks on the path to mastery. To reach their full potential, martial artists need to delve into their own psyches to conquer the mental blocks that hold them back and remove the mental clutter that cloud the understanding of fundamental principles. It is in this process of looking inward that the martial artists realize themselves and grow as people.

A martial art is just like any other art form in that a martial art is a skilled pursuit which expresses aspects of life and humanity. The art can form bonds of friendship, help a person grow, and express beauty through skill. It just happens that the “art” is expressed in the context of fighting instead of the more traditional fine arts media.

Johnny Kuo

Mind Body Kungfu

MORE ON ‘ WHAT IS MARTIAL ART ‘ TO COME!

Bruce Lee: Longstreet & ‘The Art of Dying’

Posted in Day's Lesson, Discussion Question, Philosophy, Self-Defense, Teaching Topic with tags , , , , , , , , on December 1, 2012 by chencenter

Bruce Lee Header Image

One of my favorite video clips on YouTube is of Bruce Lee playing Li Tsung in the 1971-1972 television series, Longstreet.  Bruce Lee plays opposite James Franciscus (Mike Longstreet) and trains him in the art of Jeet Kune Do. (clip below)

In the four episodes that Lee’s character appeared in, the Jeet Kune Do master was able to give some extraordinary advice.  What is so refreshing about these scenes is that the viewers, for once, can see first-hand how Bruce Lee instructs another person; a person with common doubts about his/her readiness, uneasiness moving in his/her body and frustrations regarding the whole process.

The character and attitude of Longstreet is highly believable.  Being ‘ready’ (or capable) to properly defend oneself and having the emotional follow-through are often separate entities within the human being.  Lee explains “Are we not animals?… A cat or a bird would peck out your eyes without hesitating.”  Longstreet’s character is not yet ready to accept what is needed to ‘survive.’  It is at this moment when Li Tsung says,

Like everyone else, you want to learn ‘The way to win.’ But never to accept ‘The way to lose.’ To accept defeat, to learn to die, is to be liberated from it.  So when tomorrow comes, you must free your ambitious mind and learn ‘The Art of Dying.’

WHAT DOES BRUCE MEAN BY THIS?

At this point, Longstreet is not far enough in his training.  He has not yet learned to make mind and action ONE.  ‘The Art of Dying’ as Bruce Lee puts it, is understanding your own mortality… understanding that some situations, we cannot/may not walk away from.  When you have options, when you have opportunity, we may be able to capitalize.  But when we accept our own mortality, if we are willing to die, we become a much more dangerous animal.  In order to preserve our Life the one who understands the ‘Art of Dying’ is more likely (and capable) of taking risks and making sacrifices his opponent might not be willing to make himself.  The survival edge now swings your way.  An interesting concept, is it not?

Does anyone else care to elaborate?

Does it mean something different to you?

MICHAEL JOYCE

CHENCENTER.COM

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Embracing “Comfortable Uncomfortability”

Posted in Day's Lesson, Philosophy, Teaching Topic with tags , , , , , , on August 17, 2012 by chencenter

We are all guilty of is this:

Residing within our comfort zones. 

The problem is not that comfort zones exist, but that these zones are where we migrate to, and often, make the conscious choice to stay.  I’m guilty of this at times and I feel that this is one of the biggest roadblocks, not only in the martial arts world, but the world in whole.

I first started to ponder this question seriously was when I was in college.  I had purchased Anthony Robbin’s Personal Power cd series and was surprised to find out why I would have trouble becoming a millionaire (when I joined “The real world.”)

Not only did I (negatively) associate “being rich” with being stereotyped and constantly hounded for “hand-outs” but I felt that people would think that I came about my wealth dishonestly.  I personally felt (and sometimes still do) that people of monetary means must step on and swindle from others to get the “leg up.”  Goal-setting, neuro-association, and motivation aside…

a huge component to success (in anything), comes down to being comfortable stepping outside our comfortability.

In business, this may making “cold calls,” speaking in front of crowds doing or client follow-ups.  In your work-outs, it may take the form of “that class that you heard will kick your ass.”  In your personal life, it might be telling someone that you love them.  Whatever it is, we need to recognize that embracing “the different,” the often “uncomfortable” option can create tremendous psychological growth.

An abundance of psychological growth can lead to only this: greater personal power and freedom.

Our limitations (for the most part) are mental limitations, emotional limitations causing inflexibility in life and our relationships.

Exercising and building on this skill, like anything else, will get easier with practice.  Let’s start today.  Do that “one last rep” that your body felt it couldn’t do.  Say yes, to a task/challenge that you’ve been wanting to meet.  If it’s a large task, create a step-by-step process that will outline your path to success.  I’m ready… I hope you are!

Coach Michael Joyce

Golden Thread Workshops / ChenCenter

Winston-Salem, North Carolina

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