Archive for April, 2012

Silk-Reeling by Hong Junsheng

Posted in EXCERPT, Miscellaneous, Taijiquan with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 27, 2012 by chencenter

SILK-REELING

On the theory of Chan Si

Nothing is too detailed

Inside and outside spirals

Are controlled by shun and ni

Shun opens while ni closes

Hard and soft

Compliment each other.

*Translation by Master Chen Zhonghua. Winter 2002

Streetfighting 101 DVD has arrived!

Posted in Products, Self-Defense, Training, Training Equipment with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 26, 2012 by hybridfightingmethod

STREETFIGHTING 101 DVD

T.J. Kennedy, founder of the Hybrid Fighting Method does it again with the emergence of his second dvd.  One of the most important aspects regarding the physical side of self-protection is in controlling your opponent using the proper mechanics.  T.J. leads you step-by-step and goes through much more in this amazing dvd.

For a view at the kind of material that T.J. presents, please visit his YouTube Channel.

Watch “Combative Controls”

To purchase your own copy, visit this link: HFM SF101 DVD

If you have any questions, T.J. will be happy to answer the question in the comment section below.

Enjoy!

The Combative Crew

The 3 A’s of Good Business Practice

Posted in Day's Lesson, Miscellaneous, Philosophy, Teaching Topic with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 17, 2012 by hybridfightingmethod

I am willing to bet that everyone reading this right now has at least one customer service horror story?

A gym that intentionally bills you more than once each billing cycle. A phone company that destroys your life with astronomical and irrational charges. And any other possible shady situation that leaves you regretful and resentful.

Too many martial arts instructors are great martial artists, but are horrible business people. They struggle and suffer at their own hands because they do not know how to handle adversity, or they have personalities themselves that are rather off-putting.

In my opinion, if everyone incorporated these three concepts into their business practice, they would dramatically improve their business, their clients’ experience, and their own quality of life.

ACCEPT

My parents always told me when growing up, that if I did something wrong or made a mistake – that if I told the truth about it I would be in less trouble than if I lied and got caught. They were trying to teach me to take responsibility for my actions. This goes a long way in business.

I try very hard not to put myself in a position where I will have to apologize and be an inconvenience to someone. But if I do, I don’t play the blame game – I accept the responsibility for my mistake and I will offer not only my apology, but also something above and beyond to make up for the mistake. That could be free lessons, free merchandise, a gift card to a restaurant…the options are endless.

If you do this, your clients are likely to be more forgiving of your shortcomings.

Accept responsibility.

ADOPT

Sometimes random things happen that aren’t your fault. But that won’t stop people from blaming you.

I remember one year back in college, I was flying across the country to get from my parents place to my school. When we got to the airport, we were told that the airline’s head office had a major shutdown and the computers were offline, delaying every single flight that day. That company was WestJet. This was a make or break moment for WestJet in the eyes of all those affected.

My flight was delayed for 5 hours. Some were less, some were considerably more.

WestJet began by apologizing for the inconvenience, ordering pizza and drinks for the entire airport, and announcing it over the PA system. That was cool, but what came next was amazing.

Two weeks after the incident, my family got a letter in the mail from WestJet. It was an official apology for the mishap, with a note that for every 2 hours our flight was delayed, we would receive credit equivalent to the fare of our purchased ticket. Because my flight was delayed 5 hours, and I had only booked a one-way flight, we received $598.00 to apply to future WestJet flights.

I will now always speak positively to people about WestJet and their customer service. As long as they keep up this behaviour, they will be here for a long time.

Sometimes things happen that are out of our control and that are not the fault of anyone. But if you can adopt responsibility for whatever happened, and go above and beyond for your clients, you will gain far greater value than you could ever lose.

ATMOSPHERE

Finally, people want to know that you care. People are social creatures, and we gather around other people of similar values, likes, dislikes, etc.

There are few feelings more nauseating than going into a gym or membership-based business and feeling like a dollar figure rather than a valued person.

I had a woman come up to me just last night after seeing a portion of my class, and asked me when she could come try it. She is on a one-week trial membership, and she told me that in the Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu class she took the instructor was too busy texting on his phone and talking with his buddies to offer any assistance to the students in class. Sounds ridiculous, right? I have seen worse. That class is just a paycheque to him.

My good friends Gordon and Ashley Wood run a highly successful martial arts school in Ancaster, Ontario, Canada called Evolution Martial Arts. They are always expanding, and they are always getting voted as #1 martial arts school in their area by anyone and everyone who has had the pleasure of training there.

I equate their success with 4 things.

  1. They plan their classes. They do not just show up and wing it. Their curriculum is structured and this structure allows them freedom to invest most of their time into their students.
  2. They make you feel important. They know you by name, and they make you feel like a part of a family.
  3. They are highly skilled martial artists, and highly skilled martial arts instructors.
  4. They do not have contracts. If I want to leave them for any reason whatsoever, I can do so with absolutely no penalty. I will also not be made to feel guilty or negative in any way. This, I believe, has led to positive word of mouth that has launched their business into a rarified atmosphere that few other schools can claim to know.

If you can create a positive atmosphere where people are genuinely cared for, you will be amazed at the positive yield that it brings.

To summarize…

If you can both accept and adopt responsibility for mistakes that are or aren’t your fault, and create an energetic and caring atmosphere – you will improve your business exponentially in several ways.

T.J. Kennedy

Hybrid Fighting Method

O’Sensei and The Principle of The Circle

Posted in Aikido, Teaching Topic with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 16, 2012 by Combative Corner

Aikido technique is structured on circular movement, for harmony is brought about and all conflict resolved through the spirit of the circle. The response of the body, mind and spirit to the principle of the circle is vital to the creation of technique.

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A circle…

encloses space, and it is from the perfect freedom of this emptiness that ki is born. From the center of this birthplace, the creative processes of life are joined with the infinite, immeasurable universe by the spirit. The spirit is the Creator, the eternal parent giving birth to all things.

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The Budo of Aikido springs from the mastery of the spirit of the circle. The essence if this Budo is to embrace the complementary action of cause and effect and to draw into yourself all things as if they were held within the palm of your hand. You have a spirit, therefore you must realize that each person has a spirit. When the life processes are connected with the spirit and the fundamental principle of the circle is given birth in Aiki, all things are led to completion through the circle. All things are freely created by the circle. The secret of the circle is to create technique by piercing the very center of Space.

Morihei Ueshiba – Founder of Aikido

Robert Lara Sensei

Four Winds Aikido

Cus D’Amato on Fear

Posted in Boxing, External Arts, Fighters, Miscellaneous, Teaching Topic with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 13, 2012 by Combative Corner

Cus D'Amato. Portrait

Cus D’Amato [1908-1985] was a man of great integrity, knowledge and heart.  Most famous as being the manager and trainer of champions Floyd Patterson and Mike Tyson, many martial artists outside of boxing would come to learn about him through his brilliant insights on fear and the psychology of fighting.

“Boxing is a sport of self-control. You must understand Fear so you can manipulate it. Fear is like fire. You can make it work for you: it can warm you in the winter, cook your food when you’re hungry, give you light when you are in the dark, and produce energy. Let it go out of control and it can hurt you, even kill you….Fear is a friend of exceptional people.” [Fire 50]

On Recognizing Fear

“Fear is the greatest obstacle to learning in any area, but particularly in boxing. For example, boxing is something you learn through repetition. You do it over and over and suddenly you’ve got it. …However, in the course of trying to learn, if you get hit and get hurt, this makes you cautious, and when you’re cautious you can’t repeat it, and when you can’t repeat it, it’s going to delay the learning process…When they…come up to the gym and say I want to be a fighter, the first thing I’d do was talk to them about fear…I would always use…the same example of the deer crossing an open field and upon approaching the clearing suddenly instinct tells him danger is there, and nature begins the survival process, which involves the body releasing adrenalin into the bloodstream, causing the heart to beat faster and enabling the deer to perform extraordinarily feats of agility and strength…It enables the deer to get out of range of the danger, helps him escape to the safety of the forest across the clearing…an example in which fear is your friend.
The thing a kid in the street fears the most is to be called yellow or chicken, and sometimes a kid will do the most stupid, wild, crazy things just to hide how scared he is. I often tell them that while fear is such an obnoxious thing, an embarrassing thing…nevertheless it is your friend, because anytime anyone saves your life perhaps a dozen times a day, no matter what how obnoxious he is, you’ve got to look upon him as a friend, and this is what fear is…Since nature gave us fear in order to help us survive, we cannot look upon it as an enemy. Just think how many times a day a person would die if he had no fear. He’d walk in front of cars, he’d die a dozen times a day. Fear is a protective mechanism….By talking to the fighters about fear I cut the learning time maybe as much as half, sometimes more, depending on the individual.” [Heller, 60]

The Next Thing…

“The next thing I do, I get them in excellent condition….Knowing how the mind is and the tricks it plays on a person and how an individual will always look to avoid a confrontation with something that is intimidating, I remove all possible excuses they’re going to have before they get in there. By getting them in excellent condition, they can’t say when they get tired that they’re not in shape. When they’re in excellent shape I put them into the ring to box for the first time, usually with an experience fighter who won’t take advantage of them. When the novice throws punches and nothing happens, and his opponent keeps coming at him…the new fighter becomes panicky. When he gets panicky he wants to quit, but he can’t quit because his whole psychology from the time he’s first been in the streets is to condemn a person who’s yellow. So what does he do? He gets tired. This is what happens to fighters in the ring. They get tired. This is what happens to fighters in the ring. They get tired, because they’re getting afraid….Now that he gets tired, people can’t call him yellow. He’s just too “tired” to go on. But let that same fighter strike back wildly with a visible effect on the opponent and suddenly that tired, exhausted guy becomes a tiger….It’s a psychological fatigue, that’s all it is. But people in boxing don’t understand that.” …[Heller, 61]

“… However, I should add that at no time does fear disappear. It’s just as bad in the hundredth fight as it was in the first, except by the time he reaches a hundred fights or long before that he’s developed enough discipline where he can learn to live with it, which is the object, to learn to live with it…”

“Every fighter that ever lived had fear. A boy comes to me and tells me that he’s not afraid, if I believed him I’d say he’s a liar or there’s something wrong with him. I’d send him to a doctor to find out what the hell’s the matter with him, because this is not a normal reaction. The fighter that’s gone into the ring and hasn’t experienced fear is either a liar or a psychopath…” [Heller, 67]

The Hero and the Coward
“I tell my kids, what is the difference between a hero and a coward? What is the difference between being yellow and being brave? No difference. Only what you do. They both feel the same. They both fear dying and getting hurt. The man who is yellow refuses to face up to what he’s got to face. The hero is more disciplined and he fights those feelings off and he does what he has to do. But they both feel the same, the hero and the coward. People who watch you judge you on what you do, not how you feel.” [Heller, 97]

10 Questions with Ryron Gracie

Posted in 10 Questions, Jiujitsu, Videos with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 12, 2012 by Combative Corner

The CombativeCorner got to talk with @GracieBrother, Ryron the other day and answer our questions (and yours!)

If you don’t know Ryron by now (We won’t ask you where you’ve been), but please take a listen to this interview.  In it, Ryron answers such questions as:

  • Is there a secret to being “un-submittable?”  [7:35]
  • What is Ryron’s Top 5 Techniques?  [12:41]
  • Starting Jiu-Jitsu Late in Life? [27:12]
  • Who would You Fight? Bonus Q [31:42]

Also, let us know who you’d like us to interview in the future, and what questions you have for him or her.

For our Master List, go here.

Ryron and Rener can be reached via GracieAcademy.Com, on their YouTube Channel or on Twitter @GracieBrothers

For more from The CombativeCorner, click the links below.

 

 

 

RELATED POSTS:

SECRET TO GRACIE JIU JITSU MASTERY

10 QUESTIONS WITH RENER GRACIE

JOURNEY TO BLUE BELT IN GJJ

 

 

The Journey to Blue Belt in BJJ | JTBB # 1

Posted in Jiujitsu, Martial Arts, Training with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 10, 2012 by chencenter

“I am a shark, the ground is my ocean, and most people don’t know how to swim.”

Jean Jacques Machado

Like many martial artists before me, Brandon and I came to jiu-jitsu by way of the ‘Shark Tank.’  Growing up in the martial arts that were available to us, we learned how to protect ourselves standing up.  For years, in our minds, that’s all that existed in our world, and in our training.  Obviously, when the Gracies came around and the UFC started, we got our glimpse ‘behind the mountain.’  When we finally got to roll with someone with jiujitsu experience, we found ourselves struggling to stay afloat.

Life takes people in different paths.  Brandon came by way of Karate.  I came by way of Taijiquan.  Where the road would lead (for us) would be at ‘Jiu-Jitsu Junction.’ This double-lane road is paved with excitement and we proud and eager to explore this journey with you.

Stay tuned to these articles via Twitter #JTBB

In This New Series…

Together, we will explore the lessons, the pitfalls, the mindset (and more) of the student on the quest to blue belt.  And like every journey, the writings herein are not solely for the beginner.

Those of you experienced in Jiu-Jitsu…

we encourage you to comment, add, and/or reminisce with these posts.

Thanks for reading and enjoy our future posts from our List, or by following this site.  (Bookmarking or Subscribing by email helps)

Brandon Vaughn & Michael Joyce

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