Archive for October, 2011

The Gracie’s “Women Empowered” Course

Posted in Products, REVIEWS, Self-Defense, Training with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 25, 2011 by chencenter

It arrived the Summer of 2011… and finally the world has a women’s self-defense curriculum that not only is presented in a fun and energetic manner, but one that covers the wide array of violent situations with quality instruction and the attention-to-detail that the Gracies give time-and-time-again.  This review is intended to be “no-holds-barred” and will give the reader not only the strengths but weaknesses of this dvd series from both the viewpoint of a professional self-defense coach and from a beginning student. 

{Michael in off-white, Jenny’s comments in green}


Before I dive into the meat of the series – and what a succulent morsel it is – let me begin by saying that the roster is beyond exceptional in that they include two wonderful examples of “Women Empowered” in Eve Marie Torres and Sage Gracie.  Their comments are invaluable in both helping the beginner understand the pitfalls and difficulties common when anyone begins a training program and the fact they they are women helps to reinforce the female viewers that the techniques can be done effectively with the natural, inherent strength that all women possess.  Ryron & Rener (and later, Ralek) provide most of the technical advice as well as providing answers to common mistakes & questions from students they’ve had in previous classes.

After popping in the first disc and hearing them welcome you with such openness and sincerity… it’s easy to not only get excited about learning, but excited about DOING… which is (or should be) the most important characteristic of ANY learning series.

Rener Gracie is like the self-defense version of Tony Robbins.  He is so motivating and as he moves and makes some of the most interesting facial expressions, you can’t help but to have more focused energy on the task at-hand –  learning self-defense!



DISC ONE really gets the ball rolling by discussing the enemy (strangers/non-strangers) and the “Triangle of Victimization.”  What was a pleasant surprise to me and something I deem a necessity (in teaching self-defense) a strong emphasis on what the Gracies call the “Base Get-Up.”  Balance is crucial in self-defense and nothing rattles/confounds a woman more (initially) knocking her off balance.  (Regarding the “Base Get-Up) In the words of Eve, “It is not the most lady-like, but it IS the safest.”  The most important thing to take (after viewing) is that you shouldn’t expect to have the technique when you need it most if you don’t use it in everyday life.  Learn the “Base Get-Up”, train it and make it an organic part of your movement.

Having the women perform the techniques gives the viewer relatibility and identification in the movements.  In terms of video, every so often the camera would zoom in on a specific body part during the techniques which is extremely helpful for the student viewer.


Again, the Gracies begin at the beginning, and add what many instructionals (books, dvds, etc.) leave out; how to prepare your body for an attack.  In this case, tensing your neck muscles in order to resist the pressure on your windpipe.  There are some pros and cons when it comes to the “Super Slap” (endnote 2.1), however, (as someone who has taught women’s self-defense for over a decade) I can see why they choose this approach.  Regarding the remainder of the disc, you receive what Rener & Ryron consider one of the most important (if not THE most important) technique of the entire series… the Guard Get-Up.  A great deal of fear comes when your assailant has you on the ground.  In this gem of a technique, the Gracie brothers show the viewer not only show an effective and energy efficient escape, but distraction techniques (i.e. Super Slap) and distance builders (as pictured to the left).

The front choke defense and guard get-up feel very practical.  The guard get-up is my favorite because it provides hope when you are in a panic-causing position whereby the predator is between your legs.  When this happens, this technique is very useful.


In this disc, the viewer/practitioner (having 6 lessons under their belt) really begins to learn that what might have worked in one scenario, might not work in another.  In self-protection, variables change and it’s very important that the student knows not only how to remain relaxed/confident in their actions but also how to recognize when something doesn’t work.  Beginning with the Stop-Block-Frame, this disc offers the viewer a sturdy support system for any attacker that encroaches within your personal boundary.    In three distinct “slices”, the Gracies effectively show the student, first, personal defense with the attacker outside of arm’s length.  “Slice 2” covers how to “Brace & Base” when the attacker makes contact, and finally (slice 3) shows “The Frame” technique (for those persistent buggers who won’t take a hint).  *It should be noted (in my opinion) that the Stop-Block-Frame is somewhat flawed (see End Notes).

Lesson 8 & 9, however, is endorsed with the highest enthusiasm.  There are many variations of techniques in the self-defense world, but when an attacker (for example) mounts his victim but is supporting his weight strongly with his arms or (possibly a scarier & more common scenario)… he’s pinned your wrists!  What do you do?  Again, these “Extras” are perfectly placed to optimize peak performance and diminish the “quicksand” that many self-defense professionals call “The Fear Loop.”  The disc ends with a popular jiu-jitsu technique known as the Triangle Choke, which utilizes the strongest asset a woman has (her legs) against the attacker’s neck.  The ability to render your attacker unconscious is bound to empower the female viewer to new heights.

Lessons 7-10 are fun techniques.  What makes this dvd set so thrilling to own is that it provides tools for almost any situation.  (If not exactly, there is something adaptable).  Whether you are in a tight space or in the middle of a parking lot, the teachers will instruct you on how to use the technique according to the scenario and what techniques to use for the different types of attacks.  Once you are successfully “proficient” on all the moves, you will be much more confident about yourself and your ability to defend against an attacker.  (Then, it’s off to Disc 5 where you can earn a Gracie Pink Belt!)


Just when you though things couldn’t get more interesting, more empowering, the Gracies give you lessons 11-15.  As viewers… we are introduced to another Gracie, Ralek.  In this disk, the student is introduced to many of the “more challenging” situations; specifically the hair grab, attacks from behind, and attacks involving weapons.  In the world of self-protection there are numerous techniques, many of which are too difficult/complex to pull off in a high-pressure situation – NOT SO in the Gracie curriculum.  First and foremost, they present two important statements that every woman must take to heart:

  1. Those who use a weapon, normally will use as intimidation. (Usually to move you to a secondary/more isolated location)
  2. Don’t ever let them take you to a secondary/more isolated location!  (weapon or no weapon)

An important aspect however, that is rarely touched upon in weapon defense is what we should do (or expect to do) if we manage to disarm our opponent [see endnotes].

The guillotine chock happens to be one of my favorite moves.  Perhaps because I am always able to use it when my husband and I practice self-defense and other times when we are play-wrestling.  For some reason, he loves to go head first into me and then that’s when I pull the choke.  All the other moves are also fun, but are not quite as easy to perfect as this one.


In this disc, the Gracies explain that (if you so choose) after reaching a solid foundation regarding the mastery of these techniques, you may want to make a qualifying video of yourself to be evaluated by one of the Gracie instructors themselves.  Not only will you be rewarded a pink belt if pass the test, but (pass or fail) you will be given a review sheet of comments and areas that need more work.  With or without this step, the Gracie family sincerely wants to help keep women safe; and to be evaluated on your performance of the techniques is just one of the ways in which you’ll feel more empowered and capable of handling any future situation that you may (but hopefully may not) confront.


One of the most beneficial aspects of any program resides in connectivity.  The message and depth of knowledge aside, our ability to “connect,” relate and understand what women go through and may have to go through at some point in their life is (not to overuse the word) Empowering – but also comforting and reassuring.  You may listen to these talks at any point in your training and segments of these are offered for free on the Gracie’s YouTube channel.

Links :

Get the Women Empowerment Dvd Course and you’ll also receive two additional talks not found on YouTube entitled, Street Smarts and The College Talk; two very important additions.


There is absolutely nothing like this on the market today (in my opinion).  The presenters are not only young and fun, but have a deep knowledge-base and can communicate their thoughts brilliantly.  Speaking from personal experience as a self-defense coach (and primarily a “Women’s Self-Defense” coach at that), I can say with 100% certainty that the lessons in this dvd series will not only empower you, but will serve as a wonderful foundation for future study in jiu-jitsu or any other martial art you undertake.  Also, and most importantly, the techniques (if you diligently practice them) could one day save your life!

 Buy your copy today by clicking on the picture to the left or below.

The Gracie self defense program, Women Empowered, is a good foundation for learning self defense. The teaching is enthusiastic and easy to follow with funny metaphors and clear imagery to help learn the step-by-step techniques. The program not only teaches you how to do a move for escape, but also demonstrates common moves that are incorrect and weak.



We’ve discussed the Pros of the program, which are almost too numerous to mention in one review.  Here are the Cons:


The dvd is technique oriented and will surely empower any woman who decides to actively participate in the drills.  And although the Gracies discuss the emotional and psychological aspects of attack, they forget to mention that while these techniques are being applied, you can (and likely, should) be screaming for help!  While you should never rely on help, you can always improve your chance for survival (and of scaring your attacker) by vocalizing and making both your location and distress heard.


Men are fairly comfortable with physicality.  Women are not.  I’ve always believed that it is valuable (at least) to mention of the inevitability of physical (and/or emotional) pain.  Perhaps this is not what the Gracies had in mind in this “Essential” DVD set, but (in my opinion & Jenny’s) training drills involving more realistic physicality will enable the student to be better prepared for the violence that could come their way.  [Obviously this can and should be done safely with the use of pads (at least at first)]

I feel the Gracies should’ve emphasized the times where it is inevitable that you will get punched, feel pressure, and such. To complement that discussion should be a lesson or a reminder through every move taught to do movements that include protecting the face and center-line.


Rener and his brother discuss high-heeled shoes when standing. They explain that high-heeled shoes will hinder the stand-up techniques because they hinder balance and should therefore not be used during training. I would question this because women are usually taught to wear a new pair of high-heeled shoes, especially tall ones, around the house to get used to it. Soon enough, a girl could even run in those shoes, even though it’s not good for you. So if a girl can turn a pair of heels into an extension of their feet, why not train a little bit in heels for the stand-up techniques instead of not at all? At least then the training would be realistic in the situation a women might be in for attacks. The reality is, a lot, if not all, women wear heels. Why not avoid going to the ground with the attacker by not letting the heels prevent you from escape?


Also, the hair pulling techniques seem like only a way to prolong the process.  Why not strike, claw and dig if both hands are free?  Also, the head tends to rear back when hair is pulled (this is obvious).   The video should (in my opinion) adjust the training to deal with more naturalistic human responses.


The question is left open and would be helpful if it were answered, and that is: “What do we do (or expect to do) if the technique works [we disarm the gun/knife].”  I know as a self-defense coach myself, there is all sorts of liability issues with giving advice on these highly-dangerous scenarios, however, these aspects (especially in your basic course) should be touched on.  If weapons are involved, when do we run?  At what range or in what situation is it best to run?  If we get the gun/knife, do we simply threaten to shoot & call the cops or do we place a round in his kneecap?  If the need arises, where is the best place to shoot?  Do you advocate that your Women Empowered ladies learn or take a separate course on gun training and safety?  With this being said, I must commend Sage Gracie as she states plainly after executing an example of the “Armbar” (Arm break/lock), “Make sure you break the arm.”  This is a saving grace to the lesson as it had appeared (to both Jenny and myself) that the student would simply hold/ask them to drop the weapon.  In self-defense, do not give the attacker that level of mercy.

Emphasis is placed on technique, which is only one (albeit large) piece of the puzzle.  Rener says several times in the last lesson, “(When/If you gain control of the weapon) The choice is YOURS.”  And it is!  But what ARE your choices?  In the Mindset Minute, he leaves you with only a partial answer to this question.  He says, “Know one thing, break distances or do something to ensure he doesn’t take it (the weapon) back and use it on you.”  This is true.  But as a coach wishing to give my students ALL available information, I’d want to make sure they know all the available options.

Coach Michael Joyce

Assisted by beginning student and wife, Jennifer Pruna Joyce


*Michael Joyce is the owner and head instructor of the ChenCenter & the Golden Thread Workshops in Winston-Salem, North Carolina where he has lived and taught for over a decade.  Jennifer Pruna Joyce is Coach Joyce’s wife and is an aspiring writer & photographer who has recently graduated from Appalachian State University  and is just now learning the skills necessary to be proficient in self-protection. 

Sifu Lee on Teaching Yourself

Posted in Day's Lesson, Martial Arts, Training with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 22, 2011 by Sifu Freddie Lee

To those teenagers & young adults who do not have jobs & don’t have much money to spend for tuition in a Martial Arts school, do not underestimate your ability to teach yourself. If you want to get good at basketball, just grab a ball & start shooting some hoops, you don’t need a coach to do that.

If you want to get good at playing pool, get a cue stick & start shooting. The first & most important is to do it. You can learn so much just by watching, if you can watch & learn, you will progress rapidly.

There are great benefits to joining a Martial Arts school but if you are a teenager or a young adult, your parents may not approve. Many people state to me that they have been interested in the Martial Arts since they were teenagers. I say do not lose that inspiration, simply do it. Buy the books, watch the movies, & start training on your own. Start teaching yourself by watching & following. You will learn much about yourself during the process.

As you progress you may develop friendships with other Martial Artists who can help you progress more quickly. When you get a job & become an adult then you can decide for yourself to join a Martial Arts school. Even if you practice any sport or commit yourself some sort of consistent exercise program for many years, you can easily transfer those skillsets to the Martial Arts. As long as you put time to develop your body, you shall be readily prepared to reach high levels in the Martial Arts.

Sifu Freddie Lee

[Thoughts via FMK Facebook]


10 Questions with Julia Richey

Posted in 10 Questions, Fencing, Martial Arts, Videos, Weapons with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 12, 2011 by Combative Corner
Julia Richey is the head coach and owner of the Royal Arts Fencing Academy in Columbus, Ohio.  She also expanded youth fencing in the United States by putting together the Arnold (as in “Schwarzenegger”) Fencing Classic.  The next to be held March 2-4, 2012 (click here for more details).  Recently, Richey was featured in a short film by partner and fellow fencing coach, Tim Mills called “American Fencer” about Richey’s life as a young fencer and later, a successful teacher and promoter.  Watch the video here (click).
Now… It is our privilege to give you the next in a long line of amazing interviews… Fencer/Teacher extraordinaire, Julia Richey.
Fencing should be an easy sport to promote. What is the best way (in you and Tim’s opinion) to “turn on” kids to the sport of fencing?
Julia: Each club has to make a huge effort to promote itself using every opportunity to connect to the public like shows, shopping centers, big events, etc. More than that, the opportunity has to be there to try it not watch it. Watching experienced fencers fence at a demo is great, but picking up the sword yourself will make you want to do it.
We need to celebrate our stars. Students have to be raised with knowledge and respect of the fencing stars. We don’t have a  future without a past.
Tim: And our stars have to promote and be visible.
It all relates to visibility. Every kid has made something become a sword and fought in the backyard. They imitate Star Wars, Captain Jack Sparrow or the Princess Bride. When we do events people walk by all the time getting into an en garde and pretending with their friends. We are blessed with the fact that Hollywood still loves a sword fight and new movies come out every year with them. This year alone we’ve had Pirates 4 and the upcoming Three Musketeers and Puss in Boots. They just need to know it is available.
There is a lot of discussion about how to change fencing to make it more TV friendly or understandable by the public. There are certainly some things we have to do in this regard, but we put too much emphasis there. That won’t fix it. There are a great many sports that have complicated rules. If it is exciting and engaging the audience will learn the rules.
At the Arnold ( and all of our events ) we set up an area to “Try Fencing At the Arnold.” The kids are watching the fencers on 25 strips and think it looks cool, but just outside those rooms is an area where they can put on gear with their family or friends and try it out. This is a hugely successful thing that helps to get people fencing. In the case of the Arnold, they travel from around the world, so it benefits other clubs more than ours.
Really, you should come to the Arnold next March and see all the little things we’re doing to try and engage the public and get fencing in the minds of the world.
Who are some of the athletes competing today that you admire and what is it about them that sets them apart?
Mariel Zagunis, she is the first and only american fencer that one all Olympic games that existed in her weapon.
Stanislav Podzniakov ( recently retired ), did the same for russia, won it all and was a model fencer for many even here.  He will continue that role in his current position.
Tim Morehouse, besides being the best male sabrist in the country and Olympic silver medalist, he is the best promoter of our sport. He is one of a handful of people in this country that have made great efforts at bringing fencing to the public attention.
There is a longer list of competitors that I admire their fencing in all weapons.
What weapon appeals to you the most and why?
Foil, sabre then epee in that order. It’s like watching three different movies. They’re all exciting but each brings different feelings to you. The structure of the foil fencing allows you to set up and have resolution in the most powerful way.  Sabre feels like playing cat and mouse with me being the cat.  Epee is like dancing: structured with only three rules that, if you follow them,  you can win the Olympics.  Of course when I was young in the Soviet Union, girls only had the choice of foil.  

Who were your mentors in fencing? And what was something important that you learned from them?
I had a lot of them, actually. My first coach Victor Knyazev who brought me into the art of fencing and gave me more than he had to get me to the national level at the time. Through my fencing career since 1984 till now I have met and met had great experience from learning from many amazing, worldwide personalities that fenced, taught fencing or just wrote about it.
Fencing is a great sport that provides great coaches and athletes that are accessible to all of us. I just read a great article from one of our parents that Tim is about to post to our newsletter website about how awesome our sport is that his kids have trained with, fenced with and met Olympians and elite fencers from several generations. There aren’t many sports that provide opportunities like that.

In your movie, American Fencer, it showed that you suffered from a severe back problem. How did you back problems come about?… and how did you renew yourself?

My back problems started with an injury that did not occur because of fencing, but because of my fanaticism about fencing I was told by my doctors not to fence. But that was not acceptable. I just kept working at it and fought through constant pain. It reached the point that it snapped shown in in the movie. Thankfully with my knowledge and trinaing in reformer pilates and personal training, I was able to recover myself to the best back condition I’ve ever had in no time. Now, most of my pilates clients come to me to recover their backs, knees, hips after accident or surgery. Or to improve their golf swing.

Has Katya decided to fence like her mom?
She did when she was younger. She was also helping with classes and traveled a lot with me. When she became a teenager she wanted to go her own way. She fell in love with rowing. Then she shifted to artistic routes and never came back to sports ( yet ). Certainly, the fact that her mom is very competitive with almost everything surrounding fencing contributed to her needing to find her own way outside my sport.
What are the biggest obstacles in running a fencing academy?
Do you want the short list or long one?
It’s a delicate balancing act to keep clubs open that don’t have many decades of stability and a city where fencing is recognized and know. For us it is always an issue of balancing the need to get out to various locations and expand our offerings against the available resources.
We consider our fencing club our family.  We do a lot to support each other.  We offer opportunities outside the norm like lock-ins and making our short films, which the kids love to do.  That, too is a balancing act.  We have to grow in size in order to survive, but at the same time we can’t grow so big that the personal touch and connection isn’t there from us.  Fencing is all about relationships, whether it is our opponent on the strip, the referee or your coaches.  Like any relationship, they require a lot of work and fine tuning.  The hectic “real” world often challenges what we would like to do.
Continuing our theme, visibility is the hardest thing to do.  There are still a lot of misconceptions about fencing.  Breaking those barriers and getting the media to see fencing as a viable story is often difficult.  We’re fortunate that we have a huge event with Arnold Schwarzenegger to help us.  But again, that may help other clubs more than us.  It is difficult to take the limited resources a club generates and get advertising and visibility on almost no budget.
We do anything and everything to get in front of people.  And then we let them try it.  The nice thing about fencing is that even if someone comes through and doesn’t like it or thinks it’s more work than they thought it would be, they’re still going to tell their friends they got to fence.  So it works in our favor.  We could actually write an endless list of things about running clubs.
(Combative Corner…  I wish you would)
What are you future goals, for this year or for the next 5?
Like in preparation for Olympic games I have big goals and small ones that serve the big ones. TIm and I working every day on creating different tools, structures and doing research on ways to reach the public to make fencing more popular. My personal crazy goal as a citizen of Columbus, Ohio ( OSU Buckeyes ) I want to make fencing more popular than football in this country. It is very hard to raise champions in the middle of the country when they don’t have competitions to overcome to become the best. We need a strong base to build off of.
Have you come to a point where you’ve decided that the saber is your favorite weapon, or are you still a foilist?
I’m always a foilist. But, as I said, they all relate. I just found ways to use my foil ability to make sabre fun, exciting and useful for me.  If I had a choice when I was starting fencing, I probably would have chosen sabre.
When Julia is not fencing or teaching or helping run a fencing academy, what does she enjoy to do in her free time?
Free time?  The parents of our fencers encourage Tim and I not to take vacations because any time we have down time we come back with more ideas and thus more work.
Sculpture. Art. That’s how I ended up running the Arnold Fencing classic.  I love music. I taught myself guitar when 16. I love to dance, which relates to next movie we’re editing now. Equestrian. I love jumping horses. I like to drive fast. Books and movies.  Good food. And my main favorite I love people and like to have experience of meeting and discovering different personalities.

Standing Three Circle Qigong | Eli Montaigue

Posted in Day's Lesson, Internal Arts, Peace & Wellbeing, Qigong, Teaching Topic, Training with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 4, 2011 by chencenter

To me, standing Qigong is possibly the most important thing to start your journey in the internal martial arts.  And yet it the part most people spend the least time training in, because it’s too hard, and boring.  Whether you’re more interested in the healing or the martial side of the arts, standing Qigong is the place to start.

Everything else in your training, Tai Chi form, push hands, fighting form etc. will all be only external movements in the beginning.
You can not get internal Qi activation in these things until you have taking them to a high level, which takes many years for most.
Through that time, you’re working on perfecting the physical movements, gaining fitness flexibility and strength etc.


Your Qigong however will start working on your Qi right from the start, as it’s just a stance, as long as you have someone put you in it right, then you’ll get Qi activation from it. Where is in forms etc it takes years to get right, and only then will you start to get some Qi flow.  Qi will also flow better the less active your mind is, so if you’re stressed out and thinking about loads of things, you won’t get the Qi flowing.
So again, with forms, if you’ve not perfected the movements, then you’ll be thinking about how to do them.  But with Qigong all you have to do is stand there, and so is much easier to get into a no mind state.
Your mind uses more Qi than just about anything else, so to switch it off means that all that Qi can be used to circulate through the body, cleansing and healing.

HOW IT WORKS (view picture below)

Standing Qigong works by having the knees bent, to create heat under the Dan Tien. This stimulates the Qi to rise up from the Dan Tien and flow through the body. The structure then held by the body and arms helps to open up the meridian Channels through out the body.  Qi is always flowing through your body, by doing Qigong we’re only opening up the channels and enhancing that flow.

The three main things standing Qigong will do for you, is to build, balance and unblock your Qi.  Most people will have some form of Yin or Yang imbalance. The Qigong stance is a physically perfect balance of left and right, and Yin and Yang.  So by holding it, your Qi will follow what you’re doing, and so it will re-balance to a normal level.  You may notice while standing, one hand might drop lower than the other, this is a left and right imbalance, so correct the physical, and your Qigong will follow.

Creating a higher than normal Qi flow, through bringing up Qi from your Dan Tien, and also from the earth, will one, fill your body with more Qi, so you will feel full of energy. And two, by doing this you will unblock your meridians.
Think of a blocked up hose, if it’s full of gunk, and you just let a bit of water trickle through it, the gunk will never clear.  But blast a high current of water through and all the gunk will be cleared.
So when you put a high current of Qi through your body, the same thing happens, you clear out the channels.  So in everyday life, you will have a smooth and clear flow of Qi through out your body.

This is why you shake when doing Qigong as a beginner – it is the Qi trying to break through the blocked areas.


You should do your Qigong for at least 20 minutes morning and night for the first 5 years of your training.  When I got serious about my training at age 14, I would with out fail stand for at least 20 to 30 minutes morning and night till I was about 19.  From then I felt very balanced and strong, and my other training had come to a level where I was able to build Qi from it – But I still did my Qigong quite regularly.

Now, age 25, my form has become very internal, small frame, and I can get out of my form what I use to only get from my Qigong, and even more so, as moving Qigong such as the Tai Chi form is a higher level of Qigong.
But I still do my standing, as I feel it is such a great strength and Qi building method.

If you’re serious about your Internal energy development for what ever reason, get into standing three circle Qigong!


{visit the WTBA website by clicking pic below}



Contact Us at : CombativeCorner@Gmail.Com



Sifu Lee On The Art of Combat

Posted in Day's Lesson, Martial Arts, Self-Defense, Training with tags , , , , on October 1, 2011 by Sifu Freddie Lee

Looks can be very deceiving. A person can look like he cannot fight but he may have been training in combat for many years & is very proficient. It is a tactical game of strategy. Like chess you can out beat a stronger, younger, faster, & more powerful opponent with your mind. Like swimming, just b/c a person looks unfit & out of shape it does not mean he is not proficient in swimming. A very fit healthy young man may not even know how to swim & end up drowning!

I have a respect for anyone who passionately trains in the Art of Combat for many years. Even if they may appear as if they know nothing, as if they cannot fight, I know they know something & that they are capable of defending themselves. You will never know if someone is good at Chess or Billiards simply by looking at his physique & judging his appearance. He may be a Master, & you will not know until you play with him some day. If someone owns a pool table, watch out, if someone plays chess often, watch out. If someone studies combat, watch out.

I see that in the Art of Combat, to be a true Master you must strive to perfect the body. You must strive to be a great athlete. If you watch the Olympics, for anything physical, you have to be extremely fit to get to that level of proficiency. Becoming proficient in the Art of Combat requires specialized physical training. It is different than training to be great at Football, Basketball, Tennis, Soccer, Golf, Baseball, etc. Yes you may be a great athlete, but if you are not specializing in exercises most practical for combat you will not be the most proficient in that craft.

Sifu Freddie Lee

“Thoughts via FMK Facebook”



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